Twin Disc, Inc.
TWIN DISC INC (Form: DEF 14A, Received: 09/13/2013 08:10:49)

 
 

 

SCHEDULE 14A INFORMATION

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Twin Disc, Incorporated
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TWIN DISC, INCORPORATED
1328 Racine Street, Racine, Wisconsin 53403
 
NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS – OCTOBER 18, 2013

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO THE SHAREHOLDERS OF TWIN DISC, INCORPORATED

The Annual Meeting of Shareholders of Twin Disc, Incorporated, a Wisconsin corporation (the “Corporation”), will be held at 2:00 P.M. (Central Time) on Friday, October 18, 2013, at the Corporate Offices, 1328 Racine Street, Racine, Wisconsin 53403 (the “Annual Meeting”) for the following purposes:

1. To elect three Directors to serve until the Annual Meeting of Shareholders in 2016.

2. To consider an advisory vote to approve the compensation   of the Corporation’s Named Executive Officers.

3. To ratify the appointment of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, as our independent auditors for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2014.

4. To transact any other business that may properly come before the Annual Meeting.

Only holders of record of shares of common stock of the Corporation at the close of business on August 30, 2013, shall be entitled to vote at the Annual Meeting.

A proxy appointment card and our proxy statement are enclosed with this notice.  The proxy card shows the form in which your shares are registered and affords you the opportunity to direct the voting of those shares, even if you are unable to attend the Annual Meeting in person.  Please review these proxy materials and follow the applicable instructions.
Jeffrey S. Knutson
Corporate Controller and Secretary

Important Notice Regarding the Availability of Proxy Materials for the
Shareholder Meeting to be Held on October 18, 2013
 
Pursuant to rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission, we are providing access to our proxy materials both by mailing to you this full set, including the proxy card, on or about September 13, 2013, and by notifying you of the availability of our proxy materials on the Internet.  These proxy materials and our 2013 annual report on Form 10-K are available at http://ir.twindisc.com/proxy.cfm
 
YOUR VOTE IS IMPORTANT!  WHETHER OR NOT YOU PLAN TO ATTEND THE ANNUAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS IN PERSON, WE ASK YOU TO PLEASE TAKE ADVANTAGE OF ONE OF THE THREE OPTIONS YOU HAVE FOR VOTING YOUR SHARES:  (1) YOU MAY SIGN AND RETURN YOUR PROXY APPOINTMENT IN THE ENCLOSED ENVELOPE;  (2) YOU MAY DIRECT YOUR VOTE VIA THE INTERNET; OR  (3) YOU MAY DIRECT YOUR VOTE BY TELEPHONE.  THE APPLICABLE INSTRUCTIONS AND DEADLINES FOR EACH OPTION ARE STATED ON THE PROXY CARD AND IN THE PROXY STATEMENT.  IF YOUR PROXY APPOINTMENT / VOTING INSTRUCTIONS ARE NOT RECEIVED BEFORE THE APPLICABLE DEADLINE, THE PROXY WILL BE RULED INVALID.  AFTER SUBMITTING YOUR VOTING INSTRUCTIONS, SHOULD YOU FIND IT CONVENIENT TO ATTEND THE MEETING, YOU MAY REVOKE YOUR PRIOR INSTRUCTIONS AND VOTE IN PERSON.

 
 

 

2013 Proxy Statement
TWIN DISC, INCORPORATED
September 13, 2013

DATE, TIME AND PLACE OF MEETING

This proxy statement is furnished in connection with the solicitation by the Board of Directors of the Corporation of proxies for use at the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held at 2:00 P.M. (Central Time), at the Corporate Offices, 1328 Racine Street, Racine, Wisconsin 53403 on Friday, October 18, 2013, or any adjournment thereof.  Holders of common stock of record at the close of business on August 30, 2013, are entitled to vote at the Annual Meeting and each shareholder shall have one vote for each share of common stock registered in the shareholder’s name.  Shares represented by a signed proxy appointment or electronic proxy vote will be voted in the manner specified in the form of proxy or, if no specification is made, in a manner consistent with the Board of Directors’ recommendation for each of the proposals mentioned therein.  The presence of a majority of the outstanding shares of common stock of the Corporation, either in person or represented by a signed proxy appointment or electronic proxy vote, will constitute a quorum at the Annual Meeting.  The Corporation intends to mail this proxy statement to shareholders on or about September 13, 2013.

PROXY APPOINTMENT AND REVOCATION

Shareholders may vote by delivery, either in person, by mail or by messenger, of the enclosed proxy appointment form.  Appointment forms must be received by the Secretary not less than 48 hours prior to the date of the meeting.  The proxy appointment form must be signed in handwriting.  The signature must be sufficiently legible to allow the inspector to distinguish it as representing the name of the registered shareholder, or must be accompanied by a rubber stamp facsimile or hand-printed name, including the shareholder’s surname and either the shareholder’s first or middle name as represented on the corporate records and any titles, offices or words indicating agency which appear in the corporate records.  PROXY APPOINTMENT FORMS NOT MEETING THE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS WILL BE RULED INVALID.

Shareholders may also vote via the Internet by accessing www.investorvote.com/twin or by telephone at   1-800-652-8683.  The telephone and Internet voting procedures are designed to authenticate the shareholder’s identity, to allow the shareholder to give voting instructions and to confirm that such instructions have been properly recorded.  Shareholders may vote via the Internet or by telephone up to 11:59 PM Eastern Time on Thursday, October 17, 2013.  Shareholders that vote via the Internet should understand that there might be costs associated with electronic access that they must bear, such as usage charges from Internet access providers and telecommunications companies.

The person giving the proxy may revoke it before it is exercised, either in person, by mail or by messenger, by submitting a later dated proxy appointment form to the Secretary at least 48 hours prior to the date of the Annual Meeting.  If the proxy was voted via the Internet or by telephone, the person may revoke the proxy by entering a new vote via the Internet or telephone prior to the time that Internet and telephone voting closes. The person giving the proxy may also revoke it by openly stating the revocation at the Annual Meeting, by voting at the Annual Meeting in person, or by delivering a signed written statement revoking the proxy to the Secretary prior to the date of the Annual Meeting.  ANY ATTEMPTED REVOCATIONS NOT MEETING THE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS WILL BE RULED INVALID.

RECORD DATE

The record date with respect to this solicitation is August 30, 2013.  On that date, there were outstanding 11,255,519 shares of common stock of the Corporation entitled to vote at the Annual Meeting.  There also are 200,000 shares of no-par preferred stock authorized, of which 150,000 shares have been designated Series A Junior Preferred Stock, but none are outstanding.

SHAREHOLDER PROPOSALS FOR 2014

If a shareholder wishes to present a proposal for consideration for inclusion in the Notice of the Meeting and Proxy Statement for the 2014 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, the proposal must be received at the Corporation’s principal executive offices no later than May 16, 2014.  Shareholder proposals received later than July 15, 2014 will be considered untimely, and will not be considered at the Corporation’s 2014 Annual Meeting.  Any such proposal must comply with the requirements of Section (14)(a) of the Corporation’s Restated Bylaws.

If a shareholder wishes to nominate a person for election to the Board of Directors of the Corporation, such nomination shall be made pursuant to timely notice in writing to the Secretary of the Corporation.  To be timely for the 2014 Annual Meeting, such notice must be delivered to or mailed and received at the principal executive offices of the Corporation no later than July 15, 2014.  Any such notice must comply with the requirements of Section (14)(b) of the Corporation’s Restated Bylaws.


PERSONS MAKING THE SOLICITATION

The proxy is being solicited by the Corporation’s Board of Directors and will be voted in favor of the Directors’ recommendations on each and all matters properly brought before the Annual Meeting, unless the undersigned shareholder specifically instructs the holder or holders of the proxy to the contrary.


VOTES REQUIRED FOR PROPOSALS AND HOW VOTES WILL BE COUNTED

With respect to the election of Directors (Proposal No. 1), votes may be cast in favor or withheld.  Votes that are withheld will have no legal effect and will not be counted as votes cast in the election of Directors.  Assuming a quorum is present, Directors shall be elected by a plurality of votes cast by the shares entitled to vote at the Annual Meeting (i.e., the individuals with the largest number of votes cast in favor of their election will be elected as Directors, up to the maximum number of Directors to be chosen in the election). In the event two (2) or more persons tie for the last vacancy to be filled, a run-off vote shall be taken from among the candidates receiving the tie vote.  Broker non-votes, as defined below, will be counted for purposes of determining a quorum, but will not be counted as votes cast in the election of Directors.

With respect to the advisory vote on the compensation of the Corporation’s Named Executive Officers (Proposal No. 2), votes may be cast “For” or “Against” the resolution.  Votes “For” must exceed votes “Against” in order for the resolution on compensation of the Named Executive Officers to be considered approved by the shareholders.  This vote is not binding on the Corporation.  The Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors will take the results of the vote into consideration in addressing future compensation policies and practices.

With respect to the ratification of the appointment of independent auditors (Proposal No. 3), votes may be cast “For” or “Against.”  The appointment will be ratified if a majority of the shares present and entitled to vote on the matter are voted “For” ratification.  If the appointment of the independent auditors is not ratified, the Audit Committee will reconsider such appointment.

Abstentions may be specified on all proposals submitted to shareholders, other than for the election of Directors.  Abstentions will be counted for purposes of determining the presence or absence of a quorum for the transaction of business at the Annual Meeting, but will not be counted as votes cast with respect to any of the proposals.

Brokers who hold shares in street name for customers may vote their shares with respect to certain matters without specific instructions from the beneficial owners of the shares.  However, brokers who hold shares in street name are not permitted to vote on certain other matters without specific instructions from the beneficial owners.  A “broker non-vote” occurs on an item submitted for shareholder approval when the broker does not have the authority to vote on the item in the absence of instructions from the beneficial owner and the broker does not in fact receive such instructions.  A broker non-vote is treated as “present” for purposes of determining a quorum, has the effect of a vote against a particular proposal when a majority of the issued and outstanding shares is required for approval of the proposal, and has no effect when a majority of the shares present in person or by proxy and entitled to vote or a plurality or majority of the votes cast is required for approval.

Brokers and other nominees may vote on the ratification of the appointment of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP as our independent auditors for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2014 (Proposal No. 3) without specific instructions from beneficial owners.  Therefore, no broker non-votes are expected to exist in connection with this proposal.  However, brokers or other nominees may not vote on the election of Directors to serve until the Annual Meeting of Shareholders in 2016 (Proposal No. 1) or on the advisory vote on Named Executive Officer compensation (Proposal No. 2) without specific instructions from the beneficial owners of the shares.  Therefore, an undetermined number of broker non-votes may occur on Proposals No. 1 and 2.


PRINCIPAL SHAREHOLDERS, DIRECTORS AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS


PRINCIPAL SHAREHOLDERS

Based upon the records of the Corporation, filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission as of August 23, 2013 and additional information obtained by the Corporation, the following table sets forth the persons or group of persons having beneficial ownership (as defined by the Securities and Exchange Commission) of more than 5% of the issued and outstanding common stock of the Corporation.


   
Nature of
   
   
Beneficial
Amount
Percent of
Name
Address
Ownership
Owned
Class
         
Michael E. Batten
3419 Michigan Blvd.
Power to vote
2,137,740 (1)
19.0%
 
Racine, WI
Beneficial
465,774 (2)
4.1%
         
GAMCO Investors, Inc.
One Corporate Center
Power to vote &
1,252,064 (3)
11.1%
 
Rye, NY
dispose of stock
   
         
Goldman Sachs Asset
200 West Street
Power to vote &
575,854
5.1%
    Management LP
New York, NY
dispose of stock
   
         
         
(1) Held as trustee under various trusts.
(2) Includes 10,400 shares owned by the wife of Michael E. Batten, 8,878 shares of restricted stock that vest in fiscal 2015, and 16,455 shares of restricted stock that vest in fiscal 2016.
(3) Represents shares held by various entities which are directly or indirectly controlled by Mario J. Gabelli and for which he acts as chief investment officer.


 
 

 


DIRECTORS AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

Based upon the records of the Corporation, filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission as of August 23, 2013 and additional information obtained by the Corporation, the following table sets forth the number of shares of common stock of the Corporation beneficially owned by each of the Directors of the Corporation, each of the executive officers named in the Summary Compensation Table and the number of shares beneficially owned by all Directors and executive officers of the Corporation as a group.

Name of
Amount and Nature
 
Beneficial Owner
of Beneficial Ownership (1)
Percent of Class
Michael E. Batten
2,603,514 (2)
23.1%
John H. Batten
90,804 (3)
*
Christopher J. Eperjesy
62,330 (4)
*
James E. Feiertag
63,517 (5)
*
Dean J. Bratel
31,383 (6)
*
Michael Doar
17,302 (7)
*
Malcolm F. Moore
15,156 (7)
*
David B. Rayburn
31,576 (7)
*
Michael C. Smiley
7,502 (7)
*
Harold M. Stratton II
21,902 (7)
*
David R. Zimmer
16,652 (7)
*
     
All Directors and
   
Executive Officers
   
as a group (13 persons)
3,021,344 (7)
26.8%

* Denotes ownership of less than one percent of shares outstanding.

(1) Shares listed include any shares owned by a spouse, minor children and immediate relatives who share the same household as a Director or officer. Inclusion of any such shares is not to be considered an admission of beneficial ownership.
(2) Includes 10,400 shares held by Mr. Batten’s wife, 2,137,740 shares held by him as trustee under various family trusts, 8,878 shares of restricted stock that vest in fiscal 2015 , and 16,455 shares of restricted stock that vest in fiscal 2016 .
(3) Includes restricted stock grants of 5,446 shares that vest in fiscal 2015 , 12,594 shares that vest in fiscal 2016, and 11,498 shares that vest in fiscal 2017.
(4) Includes restricted stock grants of 3,954 shares that vest in fiscal 2015 , 10,425 shares that vest in fiscal 2016, and 6,962 shares that vest in fiscal 2017 .
(5) Includes restricted stock grants of 3,795 shares that vest in fiscal 2015 , 8,302 shares that vest in fiscal 2016, and 6,947 shares that vest in fiscal 2017 .
(6) Includes restricted stock grants of 2,229 shares that vest in fiscal 2015 , 4,638 shares that vest in fiscal 2016, and 5,052 shares that vest in fiscal 2017 .
(7) Shares subject to currently exercisable stock options included in the above are as follows:  Mr. Doar 2,400, Mr. Moore 4,800, Mr. Rayburn 7,200, Mr. Stratton 7,200 and all Directors and executive officers as a group 21,600.  Also included above are unvested restricted shares as follows:  Mr. Doar 3,123, Mr. Moore 3,123, Mr. Rayburn 3,123, Mr. Smiley 3,123, Mr. Stratton 3,123 and Mr. Zimmer 3,123.


 
 

 

PROPOSAL 1:  ELECTION OF DIRECTORS

The Board of Directors has nominated the following persons to serve as Directors for the Corporation, each for a term to expire at the Annual Meeting of Shareholders following the fiscal year ending June 30, 2016. Shares of common stock represented by properly executed proxy appointments in the accompanying form or electronic proxy vote will be voted for the three nominees listed unless authority to do so is withheld.

 
Principal Occupation and Other
   
Name and
Public Company Directorships
 
Served as Director
Current Age
Held Within Past Five Years
Skills and Qualifications
Continuously Since
       
John H. Batten*. . . . . .
President and
Mr. Batten is a sitting President
December 2002
   Age 48
Chief Operating Officer,
and COO of a
 
 
Twin Disc, Incorporated
public company. His skill sets
 
 
since July 2008;
include strategic and operational
 
 
formerly Executive Vice
planning, financial oversight, and
 
 
President since October 2004,
organizational development as
 
 
and Vice President and General
well as extensive domestic and
 
 
Manager, Marine & Propulsion
international experience in en-
 
 
since 2001
gineered products and a complex
 
   
manufacturing environment.
 
       
Harold M. Stratton II. .
Chairman of the Board,
Mr. Stratton is Board Chairman
July 2004
Age 65
Strattec Security Corporation,
and recently retired CEO of a
 
 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
public company.  He is skilled
 
 
(A leading manufacturer of
in strategic planning, financial
 
 
mechanical and electro-mechan-
oversight, compensation
 
 
ical locks, latches, power
and organizational matters.
 
 
opening/closing systems and
In addition, he has experience
 
 
related security/access
in international markets and in
 
 
control products for global
an industry involving complex
 
 
automotive manufacturers)
manufacturing and products with
 
   
high engineering content.
 
       
Michael C. Smiley. . . .
Chief Financial Officer,
Mr. Smiley is a sitting CFO of a
April 2010
Age 54
Zebra Technologies Corp.,
public company.  His
 
 
Lincolnshire, Illinois
competencies include strategic
 
 
(A provider of a broad
planning, financial oversight,
 
 
range of innovative technology
mergers and acquisitions,
 
 
solutions to identify, track, and
extensive domestic and
 
 
manage the deployment of
international experience in
 
 
critical assets for improved
complex manufacturing and
 
 
business efficiency)
engineered and technology
 
   
products.
 
       

 * John H. Batten is the son of Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Michael E. Batten.


THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS RECOMMENDS THAT YOU VOTE IN FAVOR OF ELECTING THE NOMINEES LISTED ABOVE AS DIRECTORS.  UNLESS YOU INDICATE OTHERWISE ON YOUR PROXY, YOUR SHARES WILL BE VOTED “FOR” THE ELECTION OF EACH OF THESE NOMINEES AS DIRECTORS.

 
 

 


The Directors whose terms are continuing, and the classes to which they have been elected, are set forth below.  Each Director whose term is continuing was elected to his present term of office by a vote of shareholders at a meeting for which proxies were solicited.


 
Principal Occupation and Other
     
Name and
Public Company Directorships
 
Served as Director
 
Current Age
Held Within Past Five Years
Skills and Qualifications
Continuously Since
 
         
CONTINUING DIRECTORS WHOSE TERMS EXPIRE IN 2014:
   
         
Michael E. Batten . . . .
Chairman and
Mr. Batten is a sitting CEO of a
May 1974
 
Age 73
Chief Executive Officer,
public company. His skill sets
   
 
Twin Disc, Incorporated;
include strategic planning,
   
 
Also Past Director, Briggs &
financial oversight, compensation
   
 
Stratton Corporation,
and organizational development.
   
 
Wauwatosa, Wisconsin
His career includes extensive
   
   
experience in international
   
   
business, mergers and acquisi-
   
   
tions, and complex manufactured
   
   
and engineered products.
   
         
         
Michael Doar . . . . . .
Chairman and Chief
Mr. Doar is a sitting CEO of a
October 2008
 
Age 58
Executive Officer,
public company. His experience
   
 
Hurco Companies, Inc.
includes strategic planning,
   
 
Indianapolis, Indiana
financial oversight, compensation
   
 
(A global manufacturer
and organizational competencies.
   
 
of machine tools)
His career in the capital goods
   
   
industry has exposed him to com-
   
   
plex manufacturing and engineer-
   
   
ing solutions on a global basis.
   
         
David R. Zimmer. . . . .
Retired Managing Partner,
Mr. Zimmer is a former CEO of
July 1995
 
Age 67
Stonebridge Equity LLC,
a public company and has also
   
 
Troy, Michigan,
held a CFO position in a public
   
 
(A merger, acquisition and
company.  His skill sets include
   
 
value consulting firm);
strategic planning, financial
   
 
Formerly Chief Executive
oversight, compensation, and
   
 
Officer, Twitchell Corporation,
organizational development.
   
 
Dothan, AL (A privately held
His career includes international
   
 
manufacturer and marketer of
business in complex
   
 
highly engineered synthetic
manufacturing related
   
 
yarns, fabrics, extrusions, and
industries, as well as
   
 
coatings);
mergers and acquisitions.
   
 
Also Director, Detrex Corp.
     
 
and Strattec Security Corp.
     
         


 
 

 


 
Principal Occupation and Other
     
Name and
Public Company Directorships
 
Served as Director
 
Current Age
Held Within Past Five Years
Skills and Qualifications
Continuously Since
 
         
CONTINUING DIRECTORS WHOSE TERMS EXPIRE IN 2015:
   
         
         
David. B. Rayburn. . . .
Retired President and
As a former CEO of a public
July 2000
 
Age 65
Chief Executive Officer,
company, Mr. Rayburn has
   
 
Modine Manufacturing
experience and skill sets in
   
 
Company,
strategic planning, financial
   
 
Racine, Wisconsin
oversight, compensation policy
   
 
(A manufacturer of heat
and practices as well as
   
 
exchange equipment)
organizational structure.  In
   
   
addition, Mr. Rayburn’s
   
   
background includes
   
   
international business, mergers
   
   
and acquisitions, engineering and
   
   
manufacturing in an industry
   
   
related to the Corporation.
   
         
Malcolm F. Moore. . . .
President and CEO,
Mr. Moore is the recently
October 2006
 
Age 63
Digi-Star, LLC
retired CEO of a public company.
   
 
Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin
His experience includes strategic
   
 
(Provider of measuring solutions
planning, financial oversight,
   
 
for Precision Agriculture);
including holding the position of
   
 
President and CEO, Port
CFO, compensation policy and
   
 
Royal Partners, LLC, Naples,
practices, and organizational
   
 
Florida (An enterprise focusing
development.  Mr. Moore has
   
 
on investments in the marine
extensive international
   
 
industry);  Retired President and
experience in manufacturing and
   
 
Chief Executive Officer, Gehl
engineering related industries.
   
 
Company, West Bend,
     
 
Wisconsin (A manufacturer and
     
 
distributor of compact
     
 
equipment for construction and agricultural markets);
     
 
Also Director, Ag Growth
     
 
International
     

 
 

 

PROPOSAL 2:  ADVISORY VOTE ON THE COMPENSATION OF
THE CORPORATION’S NAMED EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

As required by Section 14A of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (as amended), the Board of Directors is holding a separate, non-binding advisory vote seeking approval of the compensation of the Corporation’s Named Executive Officers, as disclosed in the “Executive Compensation” portion of this Proxy Statement.  This proposal, commonly known as “Say on Pay,” gives you the opportunity to indicate your support or lack of support for the Corporation’s fiscal 2013 compensation practices and programs for the Named Executive Officers by voting on the following resolution:

RESOLVED , that the compensation paid to the Corporation’s Named Executive Officers, as disclosed pursuant to Item 402 of Regulation S-K, including the Compensation Discussion and Analysis, compensation tables and narrative discussion, is hereby APPROVED .

As described in the “Compensation Discussion and Analysis” section of this Proxy Statement, and in particular the “Executive Summary” portion of the Compensation Discussion and Analysis, the Corporation has established a compensation program that is designed to attract and retain key employees, and reward those employees for the short-term and long-term performance of the Corporation.

A significant portion of the potential compensation of the Corporation’s Named Executive Officers is directly linked to the Corporation’s performance and the creation of shareholder value, and payments under the Corporation’s incentive programs have correlated to the Corporation’s actual performance.  For example, consistent with the Corporation’s achievements against targeted profitability, sales growth and inventory levels over the past fiscal year, each of the Named Executive Officers received an annual incentive under the Corporate Incentive Plan equal to 0% of their target bonus amount.  In addition, long-term performance stock and performance stock unit awards that were granted in 2010 subject to a three-year profitability objective vested at the maximum amount in 2013, based on the cumulative profitability of the Corporation over the past three fiscal years.

The Corporation also maintains compensation practices that are aligned with sound governance practices.  For example, the Corporation’s agreements with its Named Executive Officers are designed to avoid excess parachute payments under Section 280G of the Internal Revenue Code, and thus do not provide for excise tax gross-ups for excess parachute payments.  In addition, the Corporation’s change in control severance agreements with its Named Executive Officers contain “double trigger” provisions (i.e., both a change in control and an involuntary termination or resignation for good reason) in order for outstanding equity awards to vest and be paid.

This shareholder vote is advisory, and therefore not binding on the Corporation.  However, the Board of Directors and its Compensation Committee will take the results of the vote into consideration in addressing future compensation policies and practices.

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS RECOMMENDS THAT YOU VOTE IN FAVOR OF THE RESOLUTION TO APPROVE THE COMPENSATION PAID TO THE CORPORATION’S NAMED EXECUTIVE OFFICERS. UNLESS YOU INDICATE OTHERWISE ON YOUR PROXY, YOUR SHARES WILL BE VOTED “FOR” THE RESOLUTION TO APPROVE THE COMPENSATION PAID TO THE CORPORATION’S NAMED EXECUTIVE OFFICERS.

 
 

 

PROPOSAL 3:  RATIFICATION OF APPOINTMENT OF
INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

The Audit Committee has selected PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (“PricewaterhouseCoopers”) as our independent registered public accounting firm for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2014, including service to our consolidated subsidiaries.  PricewaterhouseCoopers has acted in this capacity since 1928.  A representative of PricewaterhouseCoopers will be present at the Annual Meeting, will be given the opportunity to make a statement if he or she so desires, and will be available to respond to appropriate questions.  Stockholder ratification of the selection of PricewaterhouseCoopers as our independent registered public accounting firm is not required.  However, the Audit Committee deems it good corporate governance to submit the selection of PricewaterhouseCoopers to the stockholders for ratification.

Fees to Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

Audit Fees
Aggregate fees billed for professional services rendered by PricewaterhouseCoopers in connection with (i) the audit of the Corporation’s consolidated financial statements as of and for the years ended June 30, 2013 and June 30, 2012, including statutory audits of the financial statements of the Corporation’s affiliates, and (ii) the limited reviews of the Corporation’s quarterly financial statements were $908,000 and $856,000, respectively.

Audit-Related Fees
Aggregate fees billed for professional services rendered by PricewaterhouseCoopers for assurance and services reasonably related to the performance of the audit or review of the Corporation’s financial statements not included in audit fees above were $0 and $0 for the years ended June 30, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

Tax Fees
In addition to the other fees described above, aggregate fees of $217,000 and $391,000 were billed by PricewaterhouseCoopers during the years ended June 30, 2013 and 2012, respectively, pertaining to tax compliance, tax advice, and tax planning. Included in this amount are fees for tax compliance services of $211,000 and $189,000 during the years ended June 30, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

All Other Fees
During the years ended June 30, 2013 and 2012, PricewaterhouseCoopers did not bill any fees to the Corporation for products and services other than those listed above.

The Audit Committee has determined that the provision of services rendered above that were not related to its audit of the Corporation’s financial statements were at all times compatible with maintaining PricewaterhouseCoopers’ independence.

Pre-Approval Policies and Procedures

The Audit Committee annually pre-approves known or anticipated audit and non-audit services and fees.  Additional non-audit services and fees not included in the annual pre-approval are submitted to a designated committee member for approval before the work is performed.  For the year ended June 30, 2013, 100% of audit-related, tax and other fees were pre-approved.

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS RECOMMENDS THAT YOU VOTE TO RATIFY THE SELECTION OF PRICEWATERHOUSECOOPERS LLP AS OUR INDEPENDENT AUDITORS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2014.  UNLESS YOU INDICATE OTHERWISE, YOUR PROXY WILL BE VOTED "FOR" RATIFICATION.

 
 

 

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
 
The Corporation's business is conducted under the direction of the Board of Directors, pursuant to the laws of the State of Wisconsin and our Restated Bylaws.  Members of the Board of Directors are kept informed of the Corporation’s business through discussions with the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer and with key members of management, by reviewing materials provided to them, and by participating in meetings of the Board of Directors and its committees.
 
 
The Corporation has reviewed its corporate governance policies and practices, particularly in light of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010, and rule changes made or proposed by the Securities and Exchange Commission and the NASDAQ Stock Market.  We believe that our current policies and practices meet all applicable requirements.  Our updated corporate governance policies, including updated charters for committees of the Board, are made available to our shareholders on our website, www.twindisc.com , and/or through appropriate mailings.
 
 
Board Independence
 
 
The Corporation requires, as set forth in its Guidelines for Corporate Governance, that a majority of the Board members be independent outside Directors.  "Independent Director," as used here, means a person other than an officer or employee of the Corporation or its subsidiaries or any other individual having a relationship which, in the opinion of the Board, would interfere with the exercise of independent judgment in carrying out the responsibilities of a Director.  At a minimum, to qualify as "independent," a Director must so qualify under governing rules, regulations and standards, including those issued by the SEC and the NASDAQ Stock Market.  The Nominating and Governance Committee of the Board assesses independence on an ongoing basis, and the Directors are responsible for bringing to the attention of the Nominating and Governance Committee any changes to their status that may affect independence.  In addition, the Directors are required to complete, on at least an annual basis, a questionnaire prepared by the Corporation that is designed to elicit information that relates to the independence assessment.  A majority of the current Board of Directors are independent Directors.
 
 
The Board has determined that the following Directors are independent within the meaning of SEC regulations, the listing standards of the NASDAQ Stock Market and the Corporation's Guidelines for Corporate Governance:  Messrs. Doar, Moore, Rayburn, Smiley, Stratton and Zimmer.
 
 
Board Leadership Structure
 
 
The Corporation currently combines the roles of Chairman and Chief Executive Officer.  The Board of Directors believes that combining these positions best serves the interests of the Corporation by providing clear direction and a unified voice, especially in light of the substantial experience that our current Chairman and Chief Executive Officer has with the Corporation.  Mr. M. Batten’s in-depth knowledge of the Corporation’s products, customers, history and values allows him to set appropriate agendas and provide leadership for the full Board, as well as to lead effectively the Corporation’s management team in the execution of the Board’s decisions and the day-to-day operations of the Corporation.
 
Effective November 1, 2013, Mr. M. Batten will step down from his position as Chief Executive Officer of the Corporation, and he will retire from the employment of the Company effective December 31, 2013.  It is expected that Mr. M. Batten will continue to serve as Chairman after his retirement, and that the roles of Chairman and Chief Executive Officer will be divided between Mr. M. Batten and Mr. J. Batten, respectively, effective November 1, 2013.  The Board of Directors believes that these divided roles will be in the best interests of the Corporation, as Mr. J. Batten’s long tenure with the Corporation has prepared him well to assume the leadership responsibilities of Chief Executive Officer, and the Board will continue to have the historical knowledge and guidance that Mr. M. Batten will be able to provide.
 
 
The Corporation has not designated a specific independent Director as lead outside Director.  Instead, each of the independent Directors on the Board chairs the executive sessions of the Board on a rotating basis.  The Board meets in executive session in conjunction with each regularly scheduled meeting of the full Board of Directors.  Over the course of a year, all or nearly all of the independent Directors will chair an executive session of the Board.  The Board of Directors believes that sharing responsibility for chairing executive sessions of the Board allows each of the independent Directors to take a more active role in the leadership of the Corporation, and facilitates a full sharing of the diversity of viewpoints held by the independent Directors.
 
 
Board’s Role in Risk Oversight
 
 
The Corporation’s Board of Directors is ultimately responsible for overseeing the Corporation’s approach to business risks that it faces.  The Board receives regular reports from the Corporation’s management regarding significant developments in the industries and markets in which the Corporation competes, as well as information regarding the Corporation’s financial performance, capital needs and liquidity.  With the assistance of management, the Board regularly identifies the risks that are most significant to the Corporation.  The Board’s agendas are planned so that each of these risks, the potential exposure they create, management’s efforts to manage those risks and other mitigating activities, are discussed at least annually.  Risk management is also an integral part of the Corporation’s annual strategic planning process, and risks identified through that process are also reviewed and discussed by the full Board.
 
 
Various committees of the Board also have roles in the oversight of risk management.  In particular, the Audit Committee focuses on financial risk, including the Corporation’s internal controls regarding finance, accounting, legal compliance and ethical behavior.  The Compensation Committee evaluates risks that may be created by the Corporation’s compensation policies and practices, and also annually reviews the adequacy and status of the Corporation’s management succession plans.  The Finance Committee regularly reviews and evaluates the Corporation’s risk management insurance portfolio and overall financial management of the Corporation.  The Pension Committee reviews and evaluates risks associated with the Corporation’s qualified and nonqualified retirement plans, including funding status, investment risk, asset allocation and projected liabilities.
 
 
Guidelines for Business Conduct and Ethics
 
 
Our Guidelines for Business Conduct and Ethics (the "Guidelines") summarize the compliance and ethical standards and expectations we have for all our employees, officers and Directors with respect to their conduct in furtherance of the Corporation’s business.  The Guidelines, which are available on the Corporation’s website, www.twindisc.com , contain procedures for reporting suspected violations of the provisions contained in the Guidelines, including procedures for the reporting of questionable accounting or auditing matters, or other concerns regarding accounting, internal accounting controls or auditing matters.  These materials are also available in print to any shareholder upon request.  If we make any substantive amendment to the Guidelines, we will disclose the nature of such amendment on our website at www.twindisc.com or in a current report on Form 8-K.  In addition, if a waiver from the Guidelines is granted to an executive officer or Director, we will disclose the nature of such waiver on our website at www.twindisc.com or in a current report on Form 8-K.
 
 
Review, Approval or Ratification of Transactions with Related Persons
 
 
Our Guidelines also specifically require that all employees, officers and Directors refrain from business activities, including personal investments, which conflict with the proper discharge of their responsibilities to the Corporation or impair their ability to exercise independent judgment with respect to transactions in which they are involved on behalf of the Corporation.  The Guidelines include policies on the review and approval of significant transactions between the Corporation and its officers or employees, and their relatives or businesses.
 
At the end of each fiscal year, each Director and officer must respond to a questionnaire that requires him or her to identify any transaction or relationship that occurred during the year or any proposed transaction that involves the Corporation (or any subsidiary or affiliate of the Corporation) and that individual, their immediate family and any entity with which they or such immediate family member are associated.  All responses to the questionnaires are reviewed by the Corporation’s internal auditing department and shared with the CEO and Audit Committee, as appropriate.  Based upon such review, there were no related party transactions with respect to persons who were Directors or officers during fiscal 2013 requiring disclosure under the rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission.

DIRECTOR COMMITTEES AND ATTENDANCE

Meetings of the Board of Directors and Board Committees; Attendance

The Corporation’s Board of Directors met six times during the year ended June 30, 2013.  Among incumbent Directors, t here was one absence from these meetings.   The Audit Committee met five times during the year.  The Pension Committee met two times during the year.  The Nominating and Governance Committee met two times during the year.  The Compensation Committee met four times during the year.  The Finance Committee met two times during the year.  Each incumbent Director attended at least 75% of the aggregate of the total number of meetings of the Board of Directors and of the Committees on which the Director served.

Director Committee Functions

Audit Committee

The Corporation has a separately-designated Audit Committee established in accordance with Section 3(a)(58)(A) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.  The charter of the Audit Committee is available on the Corporation's website, www.twindisc.com .  It was most recently revised on April 19, 2013.

All of the members of the Audit Committee are independent within the meaning of the SEC regulations, the listing standards of NASDAQ Stock Market and the Corporation's Guidelines for Corporate Governance.  The Board of Directors has determined that each Audit Committee member (Mr. Zimmer (Chair), Mr. Doar, Mr. Smiley and Mr. Stratton) qualifies as an “audit committee financial expert” within the meaning of SEC rules.
 
The Audit Committee's purpose is to assist the Board of Directors in monitoring the:
 
 
● Integrity of the Corporation's financial statements;
 
● Independent auditor's qualifications and independence;
 
● Performance of the Corporation's internal audit function and the independent auditors; and
 
● Corporation's compliance with legal and regulatory requirements.

In carrying out these responsibilities, the Audit Committee, among other things:
 
 
● Appoints the independent auditor for the purpose of preparing and issuing an audit report and to perform related work, and discusses with the independent auditor appropriate staffing and compensation;
 
● Retains, as necessary or appropriate, independent legal, accounting or other advisors;
 
● Oversees management's implementation of systems of internal controls, including review of policies relating to legal and regulatory compliance, ethics and conflicts of interests, and reviews the activities and recommendations of the Corporation's internal auditing program;
 
● Monitors the preparation of quarterly and annual financial reports by the Corporation's management, including discussions with management and the Corporation's independent auditors about draft annual financial statements and key accounting and reporting matters;
 
● Determines whether the outside auditors are independent (based in part on the annual letter provided to the Corporation pursuant to the applicable requirements of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board regarding the independent accountant’s communication with the audit committee concerning independence); and
 
● Annually reviews management's programs to monitor compliance with the Corporation's Guidelines for Business Conduct and Ethics.

Finance Committee

The Finance Committee assists the Board in fulfilling its oversight responsibilities for considering management’s proposed financial policies and actions, and making appropriate recommendations to the Board regarding: debt and capital structure, acquisitions, capital budgets, dividend policy and other financial and risk management matters.

Nominating and Governance Committee

The Nominating and Governance Committee recommends nominees for the Board to the Board of Directors.  The Committee will consider nominees recommended by shareholders in writing to the Secretary.  In addition, the Committee develops and recommends to the Board a set of effective corporate governance policies and procedures applicable to the Corporation, and reviews proposed changes in corporate structure and governance, committee structure and function, and meeting schedules, making recommendations to the Board as appropriate.  The charter of the Nominating and Governance Committee is available on the Corporation’s website, www.twindisc.com .  The independence of the Committee is in compliance with SEC regulations, the listing standards of the NASDAQ Stock Market and the Corporation’s Guidelines for Corporate Governance.

The Nominating and Governance Committee identifies candidates for Director nominees in consultation with the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, through the use of search firms or other advisers, or through such other methods as the Committee deems to be helpful to identify candidates, including the processes identified herein.  The Committee will also consider Director candidates recommended to the Committee by shareholders.  The procedures for recommendation of nominees by shareholders are available on the Corporation’s web site, www.twindisc.com .  Shareholder recommendations to the Committee for Director candidates shall follow the following procedures:

a.  
The Committee must receive any such shareholder recommendations for Director candidates on or before the last business day in the month of March preceding that year's annual meeting.

b.  
Such recommendation for nomination shall be in writing and shall include the following information:
i.  
Name and address of the shareholder, whether an entity or an individual, making the recommendation;
ii.  
A written statement of the shareholder’s beneficial ownership of the Corporation's securities;
iii.  
Name and address of the individual recommended for consideration as a Director nominee;
iv.  
A written statement from the shareholder making the recommendation stating why such recommended candidate would be able to fulfill the duties of a Director;
v.  
A written statement from the shareholder making the recommendation stating how the recommended candidate meets the independence requirements established by the SEC and the NASDAQ Stock Market;
vi.  
A written statement disclosing the recommended candidate's beneficial ownership of the Corporation's securities;
vii.  
A written statement disclosing relationships between the recommended candidate and the Corporation which may constitute a conflict of interest; and
viii.  
Any other information relating to the recommended candidate that would be required to be disclosed in solicitations of proxies for the election of Directors under the Securities Exchange Act.


 
 

 


c.  
Recommendation for nomination must be sent to the attention of the Committee via the U.S. Mail or by expedited delivery service, addressed to:

Twin Disc, Incorporated
1328 Racine Street
Racine, WI 53403
Attn: Nominating and Governance Committee
c/o Secretary of Twin Disc, Incorporated

In identifying potential candidates, the Nominating and Governance Committee confirms that the candidates meet all of the minimum qualifications for Director nominees set forth below.  The Committee does not have a formal diversity policy, but it does consider a candidate’s potential to contribute to the diversity of viewpoints, backgrounds or experiences to the Board as one of many factors in choosing a candidate for the Board.  In the end, candidates are selected based on their qualifications and skills and the needs of the Board as a whole, with the goal of having a Board composed of Directors with a diverse mix of financial, business, technological and other skills and experiences.  The Committee may gather information about the candidates through interviews, background checks, or any other means that the Committee deems to be helpful in the evaluation process.  The Committee then meets as a group to discuss and evaluate the qualities and skills of each candidate, both on an individual basis and taking into account the overall composition and needs of the Board.  There is no difference in the manner by which the Committee evaluates potential Director nominees, whether recommended by the Board or by a shareholder.

The Nominating and Governance Committee evaluates each individual candidate in the context of the overall composition and needs of the Board, with the objective of recommending a group that can best manage the business and affairs of the Corporation and represent shareholder interests using its diversity of experience.  A Director must have substantial or significant business or professional experience or an understanding of technology, finance, marketing, financial reporting, international business or other disciplines relevant to the business of the Corporation.  A Director must be free from any relationship that, in the opinion of the Board, would interfere with the exercise of his or her judgment as a member of the Board or of a Board committee.  This does not preclude an otherwise qualified employee of the Corporation from serving as a Director, as long as the majority of Directors satisfies the independence requirements of the regulatory bodies.  Each Director will be expected to review and agree to adhere to the Corporation’s Guidelines for Business Conduct and Ethics, as in effect from time to time.  The Committee will consider these and other qualifications, skills and attributes when recommending candidates for the Board's selection as nominees for the Board and as candidates for appointment to the Board's committees.

Compensation Committee

Scope of Authority -   The primary purpose of the Compensation Committee is: (i) to assist the Board in discharging its responsibilities in respect to the compensation of the Corporation's Directors and executive officers; (ii) to produce an annual report for inclusion in the Corporation’s proxy statement on executive compensation; and (iii) to lead the process of management succession.  The Committee approves the design of, assesses the effectiveness of, and administers executive compensation programs in support of compensation policies of the Corporation.

Effective July 1, 2013, the Board of Directors of the Corporation adopted a resolution expressly granting the Compensation Committee the authority and responsibility required by the listing standards of the NASDAQ Stock Market, which includes the ability to retain or obtain advice from a compensation consultant, legal counsel or other adviser, and to compensate and oversee the work of any compensation consultant, legal counsel or other adviser retained by the Committee.  The Committee is also required to determine the independence of any such compensation consultant, legal counsel or other adviser in accordance with the rules of the NASDAQ Stock Market.

The charter of the Compensation Committee is available on the Corporation’s website, www.twindisc.com . The Corporation expects to update the Compensation Committee charter prior to its 2014 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to reflect the authority and responsibility expressly granted to the Compensation Committee effective July 1, 2013.

Composition - The Compensation Committee is composed exclusively of non-employee, independent Directors none of whom has a business relationship with the Corporation, other than in their capacity as Directors.  The Compensation Committee reports to the entire Board.

Role of Consultants - The Compensation Committee periodically engages an independent consultant to review its compensation program for the officers of the Corporation, in order to ensure market competitiveness.  In general, the Committee has engaged an independent compensation consultant for this purpose every two years.  Toward the end of FY2011, the Compensation Committee engaged Towers Watson (“Towers”), a global human resources consulting firm, for this review for purposes of setting executive compensation for FY2012.  Towers provides the Compensation Committee with information regarding market compensation practices and alternatives to consider when making compensation decisions for the executives.  The Committee did not engage a compensation consultant in connection with setting executive compensation for FY2013, but it did review updated Towers survey information, which was increased by 3% for the base salary information and by 5% for long-term incentive compensation to reflect current compensation trends in the market.

Role of Executive Officers - The Compensation Committee makes all compensation decisions for the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer (Mr. M. Batten) and approves recommendations for compensation actions for all other elected officers of the Corporation.  Mr. M. Batten, the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, and Mr. J. Batten, the President and Chief Operating Officer, annually review the performance of each elected officer with the Compensation Committee.  Recommendations based on these reviews, including those pertaining to salary adjustments, bonus payouts and equity compensation, are presented to the Compensation Committee, which may exercise its discretion in modifying any of the recommendations presented.  The Compensation Committee also reviews the performance of the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer.  It alone determines the salary adjustment, bonus payment and equity awards for this individual.

Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation - The members of the Compensation Committee are Malcolm F. Moore (Chair), David B. Rayburn and David R. Zimmer.  None of the Compensation Committee members are former executive officers of the Corporation.  See the “Board Independence” section for additional information concerning Director independence.  The Corporation had no “Compensation Committee Interlocks” as described by the SEC during fiscal 2013.

Pension Committee

The Pension Committee reviews and recommends to the Board for approval the pension fund’s professional advisors and auditors.  The Pension Committee annually reviews actuarial assumptions, actuarial valuations, investment performance, funding policies and investment policies.

Committee Membership

In October of each year, the Board considers and approves committee membership for the coming year.  The Board’s committees are currently comprised of the following Directors, with the Chairman of each Committee listed first:
       
Nominating and
Audit
Finance
Pension
Compensation
Governance
Zimmer
Doar
Stratton
Moore
Rayburn
Doar
Rayburn
Doar
Rayburn
Moore
Smiley
Smiley
Moore
Zimmer
Stratton
Stratton
 
Smiley
 
Zimmer
         
 
Attendance at Annual Meeting
 
 
The Corporation does not have a formal policy that its Directors attend the Annual Meeting of Shareholders because it expects them to do so and because the Corporation's Directors historically have attended these meetings.  All of the members of the Board of Directors attended last year's annual meeting.  The Board of Directors conducts its annual meeting in conjunction with the Annual Meeting of Shareholders at the Corporation's headquarters.
 
 
Stockholder Communication with the Board
 
The Board provides to every stockholder the ability to communicate with the Board as a whole, and with individual Directors on the Board, through an established process for stockholder communication (“Stockholder Communication”) as follows:

1.   Stockholder Communication to Entire Board.  For Stockholder Communication directed to the Board as a whole, stockholders may send such communication to the attention of the Chairman of the Board via U.S. Mail or by expedited delivery service:

Twin Disc, Incorporated
1328 Racine Street
Racine, WI 53403
Attn: Chairman of the Board of Directors

2.   Stockholder Communication to Individual Director.  For Stockholder Communication directed to an individual Director in his or her capacity as a member of the Board, stockholders may send such communication to the attention of the individual Director via U.S. Mail or by expedited delivery service:

Twin Disc, Incorporated
1328 Racine Street
Racine, WI 53403
Attn: [Name of Individual Director]

The Corporation will forward by U.S. mail any such Stockholder Communication to each Director, and the Chairman of the Board in his or her capacity as a representative of the Board, to whom such Stockholder Communication is addressed to the address specified by each such Director and the Chairman of the Board.

Communications from an officer or Director of the Corporation and proposals submitted by stockholders to be included in the Corporation's definitive proxy statement, pursuant to Rule 14a-8 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, (and related communications) will not be viewed as a Stockholder Communication. Communications from an employee or agent of the Corporation will be viewed as a Stockholder Communication only if such communications are made solely in such employee's or agent's capacity as a stockholder.
 
From time to time, the Board may change the process by which stockholders may communicate with the Board or its members.  Please refer to the Corporation's website , www.twindisc.com , for any changes to this process.
 


 
 

 

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

Compensation Discussion and Analysis
 
Introduction

This Compensation Discussion and Analysis describes the material components of compensation paid to the Corporation’s Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, and its three most highly compensated executive officers for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013 (the “Named Executive Officers”).  For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013, the Named Executive Officers are:

·  
Michael E. Batten, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer;
 
·  
John H. Batten, President and Chief Operating Officer;
 
·  
Christopher J. Eperjesy, Vice President – Finance, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer;
 
·  
James Feiertag, Executive Vice President; and
 
·  
Dean J. Bratel, Vice President – Americas
 
In this Compensation Discussion and Analysis , we will also explain the objectives of our compensation programs, why we pay the compensation we do and how that fits with the Corporation’s commitment to provide value to our shareholders.

Executive Summary

Through the Board’s Compensation Committee, the Corporation has established a compensation program that is designed to attract and retain key employees, and reward those employees for short-term and long-term performance of the Corporation.  To fulfill these goals, the compensation of the Corporation’s Named Executive Officers consists of a mix of base salary, annual incentives and long-term incentives.  Base salary is intended to compensate the Corporation’s Named Executive Officers for services rendered during the fiscal year, their level of responsibility and experience within the industry and the Corporation, and their sustained individual performance. Annual incentives are designed to compensate the Named Executive Officers for achieving short-term corporate, business unit and individual performance goals.  Long-term incentives are intended to reward executives for sustained performance of the Corporation and are heavily weighted in favor of equity-related awards (performance stock, performance stock units and restricted stock) that are tied to the Corporation’s stock price.

A significant objective of the Corporation’s compensation philosophy is to align the interests of the Named Executive Officers with those of shareholders by paying for performance.  Key elements of the Corporation’s compensation program that support the pay for performance philosophy include the following:

·  
The Corporation seeks to set compensation of its Named Executive Officers at the market median for companies of comparable size and in comparable industries, but also allows actual pay to vary from the market median depending on individual and company performance and length of service within the industry and the Corporation.
 

 
·  
A significant portion of the compensation of the Corporation’s Named Executive Officers is tied to the performance of the Corporation, including annual incentives based on financial measurements that management of the Corporation considers important and long-term incentives that are heavily weighted in favor of equity-related awards (performance stock, performance stock units and restricted stock).
 

 
·  
The Corporation has stock ownership guidelines for each of its Named Executive Officers, thereby aligning their long-term interests with those of shareholders.
 
The Corporation also maintains compensation practices that we believe are consistent with good governance.  For example:

·  
The Corporation’s agreements with its Named Executive Officers are designed to avoid excess parachute payments under Section 280G of the Internal Revenue Code, and thus do not provide for excise tax gross-ups for excess parachute payments.
 

 
·  
The Corporation’s long-term incentive compensation plan is designed to maximize the deduction for performance-based compensation under Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code.
 

 
·  
The Corporation’s change in control severance agreements with its Named Executive Officers contain “double trigger” provisions (i.e., both a change in control and an involuntary termination or resignation for good reason) in order for outstanding equity awards to vest and be paid.
 

 
·  
The Compensation Committee considers internal pay equity when making compensation decisions.
 

 
·  
The annual Corporate Incentive Plan is performance-based and has caps on bonus payments.
 

 
·  
The Compensation Committee annually evaluates the Corporation’s compensation programs to ensure that they do not encourage unnecessary risk-taking.
 
The following provides a brief overview of the highlights of the compensation received by the Corporation’s Named Executive Officers for the fiscal year that ended June 30, 2013:

·  
For FY2013, base salaries of most of the Corporation’s Named Executive Officers were increased approximately four percent.  The base salary of the Corporation’s President, whose base salary was determined to be below the competitive range of the market median for similar positions, was increased ten percent.
 

 
·  
The Corporation did not achieve the threshold levels of profitability, sales growth and inventory turns established under the Corporate Incentive Plan for the past fiscal year.  As a result, none of the Named Executive Officers received an annual incentive under the Corporate Incentive Plan for FY2013.
 

 
·  
The Corporation exceeded the maximum cumulative profitability objective for performance stock and performance stock units granted in 2010 under the Twin Disc, Incorporated 2004 Long-Term Incentive Compensation Plan.  As a result, the performance stock and performance stock unit awards vested at the maximum amount.
 
As required by Section 14A of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Corporation held its second shareholder advisory vote on executive compensation at its October 19, 2012, Annual Meeting of Shareholders.  For the second year in a row, the shareholders overwhelmingly approved the say on pay proposal, with more than 95% of the votes cast in favor of the compensation paid to the Corporation’s Named Executive Officers.

 
 

 

Overview
 
The Compensation Committee (the “Committee”) of the Board has responsibility for establishing, implementing and monitoring the total compensation of the Corporation’s executive officers.  The Committee approves the design of, assesses the effectiveness of, and administers executive compensation programs in support of compensation policies of the Corporation.  The Committee has adopted a charter that it uses when setting agendas and schedules for their meetings.  The charter can be found at http://ir.twindisc.com/charters.cfm .

Compensation Philosophy and Objectives
 
Twin Disc believes that knowledgeable, motivated and dedicated employees can make the difference in our Corporation’s ability to execute business strategy and excel in the marketplace.  The Committee believes it is in the best interest of the Corporation and its shareholders to fairly compensate our executive team to encourage high-level performance, resulting in increased profitability of the Corporation.  Executives are compensated on the value of their contribution to the success of the Corporation, in addition to their assigned scope of responsibilities.

Compensation includes opportunities for shared risks and rewards, and reflects the results of both individual performance and performance of the Corporation.  In setting compensation, the Committee tries to ensure that the employees’ pay is fair when compared to others within the Corporation as well as when compared to employees at similar positions in other companies.  Twin Disc will pay for the value of the job to the Corporation, considering the knowledge, skills and abilities required for each job and will pay market competitive compensation, in order to attract, retain and motivate top talent.

The key elements of our officers’ total compensation package are base salary, an annual incentive program, a long-term incentive program, and other benefits.  Base salary is intended to compensate the executive for the responsibilities and scope of the job, reward sustained performance, and aid in retention. The annual incentive program is intended to reward the achievement of corporate and business unit annual operating goals, which are key to the Corporation’s overall performance.  The long-term incentive program is intended to reward achievement of sustainable, long-term performance goals, and aid in the retention of the executive, aligning the executive’s rewards with those of the shareholder.  The goal of the Corporation’s compensation program is to provide competitive compensation that encourages and rewards individual and team performance for producing both short-term and long-term shareholder value.

The Corporation believes that its executive officers should hold a meaningful stake in Twin Disc in order to align their economic interests with those of the shareholders.  To that end, the Corporation has adopted stock ownership guidelines.  Stock ownership targets are equal to five times annual base salary for the CEO, three times annual base salary for the President, two times annual base salary for the CFO and Executive Vice President, and one times annual base salary for the remainder of the officer team.  Officers have a period of four years to attain their targeted ownership level.  The Compensation Committee monitors compliance with this guideline, using its discretion to address non-attainment issues.  Compliance is reviewed annually.

Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code generally disallows a tax deduction to public corporations for compensation over $1,000,000 for any fiscal year paid to the corporation’s chief executive officer and three other most highly compensated executive officers (other than the chief financial officer) in service as of the end of any fiscal year.  However, Section 162(m) also provides that qualifying performance-based compensation will not be subject to the deduction limit if certain requirements are met.  The Committee generally seeks to structure long-term compensation amounts and plans to meet the deductibility requirements under this provision.

The Committee also seeks to structure compensation amounts and arrangements so that they do not result in penalties for the executive officers under the Internal Revenue Code.  For example, Section 409A of the Internal Revenue Code imposes substantial penalties and results in the loss of any tax deferral for nonqualified deferred compensation that does not meet the requirements of that section.  The Committee has structured the elements of the Corporation’s compensation program so that they are either not characterized as deferred compensation under Section 409A or meet the distribution, timing and other requirements of Section 409A.  Section 280G of the Internal Revenue Code and related provisions impose substantial excise taxes on so-called “excess parachute payments” payable to certain executive officers upon a change in control and results in the loss of the compensation deduction for such payments for the executive’s employer.  The Committee has structured the change in control payments under its severance agreements with the executive officers to avoid having benefits exceed the limitations and provisions of Section 280G.

Each year, the Committee reviews with management the design and operation of the Corporation’s compensation programs, including the performance objectives and target levels used in connection with awards under the Corporation’s annual and long-term incentive programs.  In addition, the Committee reviews all incentive plans for any risk mitigating factors such as stock ownership guidelines, claw back provisions, multiple performance metrics, a cap on the incentive payout, mix of incentive compensation to total direct compensation, discretionary evaluation components and vesting requirements.  The Committee also reviews the total maximum payout of the plans and the effect it has on the performance of the Corporation.  While the goals that the Committee establishes are challenging, the Committee has concluded that these goals do not provide employees of the Corporation an incentive to take unnecessary risk.  The Committee has concluded that the Corporation’s compensation policies and practices are not likely to have a material adverse effect on the Corporation.

Role of Executive Officers in Compensation Decisions

The Committee makes all compensation decisions for the Chairman and CEO (Mr. M. Batten) and approves recommendations for compensation actions for all other elected officers of the Corporation.

Mr. M. Batten, the Chairman and CEO, and Mr. J. Batten, the President and COO, annually review the performance of each elected officer with the Committee.  In addition, Mr. M. Batten reviews the performance of Mr. J. Batten with the Committee.  Recommendations based on these reviews, including those pertaining to salary adjustments, bonus payouts and equity compensation, are presented to the Committee.  The Committee may exercise its discretion in modifying any of the recommendations.

The Committee reviews the performance of the Chairman and CEO.  It alone determines the salary adjustment, bonus payment and equity compensation awards for Mr. M. Batten.

Setting Executive Compensation

Based on the Corporation’s compensation objectives, the Committee has structured the executive officers’ total compensation program to motivate executives to achieve the business goals of the Corporation and to reward them for achieving such goals.

The elements of each executive’s compensation package include base salary, annual incentive compensation, long-term incentive compensation, benefits and perquisites.  Changes to compensation are determined at the beginning of each fiscal year and are dependent upon several factors, including, but not limited to, scope of responsibilities, the Corporation’s performance, individual performance, and competitive market practices.

The Corporation looks to establish each element of total direct compensation (i.e., base salary, annual incentive compensation, and the annualized value of long-term incentive compensation granted during the year) near the market median (50 th percentile) for companies of a similar size and industry.  The Committee believes an executive’s compensation is competitive if it falls within a band of plus or minus 15% from the competitive median of data.   Because a large portion of each executive’s long-term incentive compensation package consists of performance awards, actual payments of long-term incentive compensation and total direct compensation in any given year may fall significantly above or below the market median, based on the performance of the Corporation.

The Committee periodically engages an independent consultant to review its compensation program for the officers of the Corporation, in order to provide information regarding market median compensation levels and the blend of short-term compensation to long-term types of compensation.  The consultant provides the Committee with information regarding market compensation practices and alternatives to consider when making compensation decisions for the executives.  Historically, the consultant has not selected a peer group of companies to determine market competitiveness, but rather has used survey data compiled from several general industry compensation databases.  The consultant provides information to the Committee regarding the competitiveness of each element of compensation for comparable positions.  In addition to competitive data, the Committee considers the executive’s level of experience, length of service in his or her position, the level of responsibility of the position, the performance of the Corporation and sustained individual performance when setting or approving compensation levels.

Toward the end of FY2011, the Committee engaged Towers Watson, a global human resources firm, to conduct a competitive review of market compensation levels for similar positions in similar industries.  For this analysis, Towers Watson referenced several data sources, including:

·  
2010 Towers Watson U.S. General Industry Executive Compensation Database
·  
2010/2011 Towers Watson U.S. Top Management Compensation Study
·  
2010 Mercer U.S. Benchmark Database – Executive

The complete survey participant lists for each of the data sources are provided in Appendix A.  The Committee did not consider any specific peer group of companies when making competitive comparisons or compensation decisions, and the Committee did not specify targeted individual companies from among the Towers Watson survey participants.

Relative to each of the data sources, Towers Watson referenced a broad sample of general industry companies, and utilized regression analysis to control the data sample to represent the Corporation’s size, in terms of revenue.  The Committee received information on the 25 th , 50 th and 75 th percentiles of each element of executive compensation for comparable executive positions.

The Committee used the information from Towers Watson, along with recommendations from the CEO for non-CEO executive positions, in determining each executive’s compensation package for FY2012.  The Committee did not use this information in a formulaic manner when determining each executive’s compensation, but rather took this information under consideration, believing an executive’s compensation to be competitive if it fell within a band of plus or minus 15% from the competitive median of data.

For FY2012, the base salary of each named executive officer was set within 12% of the competitive median.  The target annual incentive bonus as a percent of base salary was set at the competitive median for each named executive officer except for Mr. M. Batten, whose target annual incentive bonus as a percent of base salary was set at the 25 th percentile, and Mr. Bratel, whose target annual bonus as a percentage of salary was set at the 75 th percentile.  The target total cash compensation (consisting of base salary and annual incentive bonus payments) and target total direct compensation (consisting of base salary, annual incentive bonus and long-term incentive payments) of each named executive officer for FY2012 was within 15% of the competitive median, with the exception of Mr. Bratel, whose target total direct compensation exceeded the 75 th percentile due to the value of long-term incentive awards compared to the market median.  The value of design engineering is critical to the Corporation’s current and future success and therefore it is difficult to obtain survey data that accurately reflects its importance to the Corporation.  The Committee felt that this level of target compensation was appropriate for the responsibilities of this position.

Historically, a compensation consultant has been engaged to provide competitive compensation data every two years.  Assuming an executive is at or near the market median for his or her position, salary increases for years that the Committee does not engage an independent consultant are determined using several factors.  First, the financial results of the Corporation are used to determine the amount of a merit pool that may be available across the entire Corporation.  Next, the Committee obtains general information from various sources regarding broad market trends in executive compensation. The Committee also reviews whether the Corporation and the executive team have achieved their overall objectives for the fiscal year.  Finally, the Committee evaluates whether each executive’s individual performance objectives have been achieved and to what level.  These factors will determine whether the executive will achieve an average increase (based on the merit pool and broad market trends), an above average increase or a below average increase.

For FY2013, the Committee followed the above-described historic practice and did not engage a compensation consultant.  It reviewed updated Towers Watson survey information which was increased by 3% for the base salary information and by 5% for long-term incentive compensation, to reflect current compensation trends in the market.  It used that information, along with the recommendations from Messrs. M. Batten and J. Batten as described above, and the company-wide merit pool, in determining the elements of each executive’s compensation package for FY2013.  In addition, the Committee reviewed the results of the October 21, 2011, shareholder advisory vote on executive compensation required by Section 14A of the Securities Exchange Act.  In light of the fact that more than 96% of the votes cast were in favor of the compensation paid to the named executive officers of the Corporation, the Committee did not make any significant changes to the Corporation’s executive compensation policies or programs.

For FY2014, the Committee has again engaged Towers Watson to provide an independent review of the Corporation’s executive compensation program.  The results of that review were used by the Committee in making base salary, annual incentive and long-term incentive compensation decisions for fiscal 2014.

Base Salary

The Corporation provides executive officers with a base salary to compensate them for services rendered during the fiscal year, their level of responsibility and experience within the Corporation, and their sustained individual performance.  Individual performance is measured through the Corporation’s annual performance evaluation process.  Pay for individual performance rewards executives for achieving goals that may not be immediately evident in common financial measurements.

Base salaries are reviewed each year by the Committee.  As discussed above, salary levels are compared to the market median (i.e. 50 th percentile), as determined by using local, national and industry specific survey data and as determined by external consultants, in order to ensure executives are paid a competitive salary, aiding in attraction and retention.

Base salary adjustments, as may be appropriate, are determined annually and may be based on individual, team or Corporation performance results, as well as other factors including changes to job scope or responsibilities.

The Corporation uses a performance management system to set individual objectives for each executive.  This system allows for the annual evaluation of both performance goal achievement and competency development.  When evaluating individual performance, the committee considers the executive’s effort in promoting corporate values; achieving both short and longer-term objectives; improving product quality; developing relationships with customers, suppliers, and employees; demonstrating leadership abilities among coworkers; and achievement of other individualized goals set as a part of the performance management system.

Market adjustments to base salary may be indicated when an incumbent is more than 15% below the market median and has been in the job longer than 2-3 years.  Market adjustments may also be used to retain valuable employees in a competitive labor market.

The Committee determines and approves base salary adjustments for the CEO, and approves base salary adjustments for the members of the executive officer team, based on the recommendations from the CEO or COO.  Generally, executive base salaries are increased at rates comparable to the increases provided at other comparable companies and are at or near market levels.

For FY2013, the Committee adjusted the base salaries for the Named Executive Officers, effective beginning the first payroll period in October 2012, using the company-wide merit pool, as well as the information provided from Towers Watson as a guide.  The Committee determined that a base salary increase of approximately 4% would be appropriate for most of the Named Executive Officers to keep their base salaries near the market median, but that a greater increase for Mr. J. Batten would be appropriate in order to move him closer to the market median.  As a result, base salaries for the Named Executive Officers changed by the following percentages as compared to FY2012:  Mr. M. Batten, 4.35%; Mr. J. Batten, 10%; Mr. Eperjesy, 4.04%; Mr. Feiertag, 3.82%; and Mr. Bratel, 4.98%.

For FY2014, the Committee approved the following increases in the base compensation of our Named Executive Officers, effective beginning the first payroll period in October 2013:  Mr. J. Batten, 24%, Mr. Eperjesy, 4%, Mr. Feiertag, 4%, and Mr. Bratel 15.6%.  Mr. J. Batten and Mr. Bratel received larger increases due to their new officer positions within the Corporation.  Mr. M. Batten will remain at his current salary through his December 31, 2013 retirement.

Annual Incentive Compensation

Executive officers and selected key management participate in an annual incentive plan called the Corporate Incentive Plan (“CIP”).  This plan provides executives with annual cash incentives for achieving corporate, business unit and individual performance goals.  Specific annual performance goals are based on Economic Profit measures (earnings in excess of the Corporation’s cost of capital) and other initiatives of the Corporation that are determined annually.

The Committee reviews the CIP’s design annually and approves any CIP design changes or amendments.  It also reviews and approves annual goals, and certifies the achievement of performance targets, based on the financial statements of the Corporation.  Cash incentive payments are made after the end of each fiscal year, dependent upon corporate or subsidiary goal achievement.  In no event may the payout be more than 200% of the target.

For FY2013, each Named Executive Officer’s CIP award was based on the following:

Objective
Weight
Target
Actual
Economic Profit (defined as earnings in excess of the Company’s cost of capital)
    70%
Target:  Economic Profit = $4,000,000
Threshold:  Economic Profit = $0 (Positive Economic Profit)
Maximum:  Economic Profit = $8,000,000
 
Result= $(10,500,182)
Payment = 0% of
                   Target
Corporate Inventory (turns)
    15%
Target = 2.5
Threshold = 2.3
Maximum = 2.8
 
Result = 2.0
Payment = 0% of
                   Target
Sales Revenue
    15%
Target = $332,000,000
Threshold = $310,000,000
Maximum = $355,000,000
Result = $285,281,764
Payment = 0% of
                   Target

For FY2013, the target bonuses as a percentage of base salary were 70% for Mr. M. Batten, 50% for Messrs. J. Batten, Eperjesy and Feiertag, and 40% for Mr. Bratel.  Based on the above formulas and the Corporation’s performance, the threshold performance targets were not achieved and therefore no bonuses were paid.

An executive’s incentive payment under the CIP may be increased or decreased by up to 20%, at the discretion of the Committee, based on the recommendations of the CEO, if the executive’s individual performance goals are either exceeded or not achieved and other factors deemed important by the Committee.  The Committee alone makes decisions regarding the Chairman and CEO’s annual incentive award.

The following definitions are used in the calculations of “Economic Profit,” a key component of the CIP:

Economic Profit is defined as the return on investment in excess of the Cost of Capital.  It is calculated by taking Net Operating Profit after Tax (“NOPAT”) less (or as a percentage of) a Capital Charge (Average Invested Capital x Cost of Capital).

Average Invested Capital is defined as total assets less non-interest bearing liabilities less accrued retirement benefits less excess cash, computed on monthly trailing 13 month basis  For FY2013, excess cash was defined as cash in excess of $3 million, or roughly 1% of sales.

Cost of Capital is defined as the weighted average expectation of Twin Disc’s sources of capital, debt and equity.  For FY2013, the cost of capital has been calculated at 10% (after taxes).

The Committee reviewed and approved the performance goals recommended for the FY2014 CIP. The CIP will pay out if certain Economic Profit, inventory, and sales growth performance goals are achieved.

The Committee reviewed the recommendations and approved the target bonus percentages for each officer. The Committee discussed and determined the bonus percentage amount for Mr. M. Batten. For FY2014, the target bonus percentage of base salary will be 70% for Mr. M. Batten, 60% for Mr. J. Batten, and 50% for Messrs. Eperjesy, Feiertag, and Bratel.


Long-Term Incentive Compensation

The Twin Disc, Incorporated 2010 Long-Term Incentive Compensation Plan (“2010 LTI Plan”), which was approved by shareholders at the annual meeting in October 2010, provides for the opportunity for officers and key employees of the Corporation (and its subsidiaries) to acquire common stock of the Corporation or cash payments via stock options, stock appreciation rights, restricted stock, restricted stock units, performance stock awards, performance stock unit awards or performance unit awards.  In keeping with the Corporation’s commitment to provide a total compensation package that includes at-risk components of pay, the Committee makes annual decisions regarding the appropriate type of long-term incentives for each executive.

Because of the limited number of outstanding shares and potential for ownership dilution, the long-term incentive program currently emphasizes the use of restricted stock, performance stock awards and performance stock unit awards, which typically require fewer shares to achieve a competitive, long-term incentive compensation opportunity than would otherwise be required if only stock options were granted.

The granting of performance stock and performance stock units encourages a pay for performance approach, aligning the interests of the executive with the economic goals of the Corporation and the shareholders.  The granting of restricted stock is based on a number of factors that include rewarding sustained individual performance, increasing an executive’s ownership in the Corporation, and addressing retention concerns.  Restricted stock may also be used to incent executives in times of global economic instability when future values of stock options, performance stock and performance stock units become more unpredictable.

The composition of an executive’s long-term compensation – i.e. performance stock, performance stock units and restricted stock – is determined by the Committee.  The executive has no role or choice whether to receive incentive compensation in the form of performance stock, performance stock units, restricted stock, or other forms.

The Committee establishes the vesting criteria, including the performance goals that must be achieved in order for the award to vest.  Grants are made at the beginning of each fiscal year, or as determined by the Committee, for the ensuing multi-year cycle period.

The Committee uses external consultants and survey information as a guideline when considering long-term incentive awards for management.  They review competitiveness of the LTI Plan annually and obtain a periodic independent review.  In addition, the Committee reviews and approves LTI Plan changes as necessary, and ensures the LTI Plan’s compliance with shareholder approval requirements.

In FY2013, Mr. M. Batten received an award of performance stock units, and all of the other Named Executive Officers received awards of performance stock and performance stock units.  In order for the performance stock and units to vest at target levels, the amount of the Corporation’s Economic Profit (cumulative net operating profit after taxes (“NOPAT”) less the Corporation’s cumulative capital charge) for the cumulative three fiscal-year period ending June 30, 2015 must be greater than or equal to $10,000,000.  The maximum payout will occur if Economic Profit reaches $15,000,000; a threshold payout will occur if Economic Profit reaches $5,000,000.  The maximum payout will be 120% of the shares or units granted.  No performance stock or performance units will vest if performance is less than threshold.

The Corporation’s capital charge is calculated by multiplying average invested capital times the cost of capital.  Average invested capital is defined as total assets less non-interest bearing liabilities, less accrued retirement benefits less excess cash, computed on a monthly trailing 13 month basis.  Cost of capital is defined as the weighted average expectation of Twin Disc’s sources of capital, debt and equity.  For FY2014, the cost of capital has been calculated at 10%, after taxes.

In order to incent and retain the Corporation’s executives, shares of restricted stock were also granted to all Named Executive Officers in FY2013.  These shares will vest July 25, 2015 provided the executive remains employed with the Corporation until the vesting date.

In July 2013, the Committee reviewed the performance objective established in July of 2010 for the vesting of performance stock and performance stock units granted in July 2009 under the Twin Disc, Incorporated 2004 Long-Term Incentive Compensation Plan.  The objective is listed below:

The Performance Objective is the Company’s economic profit (measured as the difference between the Company’s cumulative net operating profit after taxes and the Company’s cumulative capital charge) for the cumulative three fiscal year period ending June 30, 2013, as specified below:

 
Performance Objective as
of June 30, 2013
   
Maximum
+$2,000,000
Target
$1
Threshold
-$2,000,000

For purposes of this performance objective, the Corporation’s cumulative capital charge was calculated by multiplying average invested capital times the cost of capital.  Average invested capital is defined as total assets less non-interest bearing liabilities, less accrued retirement benefits less excess cash, computed on monthly trailing 13 month basis.  Cost of capital is defined as the weighted average expectation of Twin Disc’s sources of capital, debt and equity.  For FY2011-FY2013, excess cash was defined as cash in excess of $3,000,000, approximately 1% of net sales, and the cost of capital has been calculated at 10%, after taxes.

The Committee determined, subject to audit, that the Company’s economic profit for the cumulative three year period ending June 30, 2013 was $13,415,614.  As a result, both the performance stock and performance stock units granted to Named Executive Officers in July 2010 vested at the maximum amount.

Benefits
 
In addition to cash compensation and cash/stock incentive programs, the Corporation believes it is necessary to also recognize the efforts of its officer group and senior management in the area of benefits and perquisites.  The Committee annually reviews the Corporation’s benefit programs for competitiveness and uses external consultants and surveys as a reference when necessary.  It approves the addition, modification or deletion of any executive benefit program, as well as the eligibility of a program to any specific executive.

Qualified Retirement Plans

The Twin Disc, Incorporated Retirement Savings Plan for Salaried Employees (“Savings Plan”) provides non-contributory retirement benefits to all Twin Disc, Incorporated salaried employees hired prior to October 1, 2003.  The Savings Plan was established August 1, 2009 to provide a retirement benefit similar to the one previously provided under the Twin Disc, Incorporated Retirement Plan for Salaried Employees, discussed below.

Employer contributions under the Savings Plan are based on a percentage of annual compensation, from 4.5% to 6.5%, based on years of service.  This contribution is deposited into an individual investment account, in which the individual directs his or her own investment elections, within an array of choices.

The Savings Plan does not allow employee contributions.  Employer contributions, which are made annually, are immediately 100% vested.

The Twin Disc, Incorporated Retirement Plan for Salaried Employees (“Retirement Plan”) provides non-contributory retirement benefits to all Twin Disc, Incorporated salaried employees hired prior to October 1, 2003.  The Retirement Plan was amended to freeze future benefit accruals as of August 1, 2009.

Prior to January 1, 1997 benefits in the Retirement Plan were based upon both years of service and the employees’ highest consecutive 5-year average annual compensation during the last 10 calendar years of service.  As of December 31, 1996, the then-current accrued benefits under the Retirement Plan were frozen and the Retirement Plan was amended to provide for future accruals under a cash-balance program. Mr. M. Batten and Mr. Bratel are the only Named Executive Officers eligible for an accrued benefit under the Retirement Plan with 27 years and 9.5 years, respectively, of pre-January 1, 1997 credited service.

The Retirement Plan was amended on January 1, 1997 to add a cash balance formula for post January 1, 1997 accruals.  Benefits under the Retirement Plan are generally equal to the sum of the benefits as frozen on December 31, 1996, plus benefits that accumulated under the cash balance formula from January 1, 1997 through July 31, 2009.  Benefits under the cash balance formula are generally stated as a lump sum amount, but may be distributed as a lump sum or as an annuity.  Prior to August 1, 2009, accruals under the cash balance formula were based on a percentage of compensation, from 4.5% to 6.5%, based on years of service, with interest credits at the thirty-year U.S. Treasury Bond rate, or other such rate mandated by the IRS in substitution of the 30-year Treasury rate, with a minimum guarantee of 3%.

The Twin Disc, Incorporated – The Accelerator 401(k) Savings Plan (“401(k) Plan”) is a tax-qualified retirement savings plan to which all Twin Disc, Incorporated employees, including the Named Executive Officers, are able to contribute up to the limit prescribed by the Internal Revenue Service on a pre-tax or after-tax (Roth) basis.  The Corporation will match 50% of the first 6% of pay that is contributed to the 401(k) Plan.  All contributions to the 401(k) Plan, as well as any matching contributions, are fully vested upon contribution.

Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan

The Corporation extends a supplemental retirement plan, called the Twin Disc, Incorporated, Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan (“SERP”), to qualified officers.  Historically the SERP has provided benefits in excess of what the SERP participants would have received under the Corporation’s defined benefit pension plan, but for certain limits under the Internal Revenue Code.  For those who were participants in the plan before January 1, 1998 (only Mr. M. Batten), the SERP benefit was calculated as an annual benefit approximating 50% of highest rate of pay (salary plus bonus) attained during a specified period, minus amounts accrued under the Corporation’s qualified defined benefit plan.  The plan also preserved the level of benefits that had accrued prior to 1998.  For those who became participants after January 1, 1998 (including Mr. J. Batten, Mr. Eperjesy, Mr. Feiertag and Mr. Bratel) the SERP benefit was calculated as the additional benefit that the participant would have received at retirement under the Twin Disc, Incorporated Retirement Savings Plan for Salaried Employees and the frozen Twin Disc, Incorporated Retirement Plan for Salaried Employees, but for the limitation on compensation used in determining benefits under those plans.

On July 29, 2010, the Corporation amended and restated the SERP to reflect changes to the qualified retirement plans offered to its officers.  As mentioned above, on August 1, 2009 the Corporation froze its defined benefit plan and adopted a new defined contribution plan that covers its Named Executive Officers.  The purpose of the SERP restatement was to refer to both the frozen defined benefit plan and the new defined contribution plan.  Because the new defined contribution plan is an individual account plan, the SERP benefits of all Named Executive Officers except Mr. M. Batten were restated as individual accounts, based on the present value of their SERP benefits as of August 1, 2009.  Mr. M. Batten is the only Named Executive Officer whose benefit under the Corporation’s frozen defined benefit plan includes amounts accrued under the frozen pension formula, and his SERP benefit continues to be expressed as a more traditional pension formula.  The restated SERP also revises the formula to provide Mr. M. Batten a SERP benefit that is at least equal to the present value of his SERP benefit as of July 1, 2010, adjusted for certain interest credits through his retirement.

The SERP benefit is payable in two lump sum payments, which are paid on the first and second February 1 in the years following retirement.  However, if the commencement of benefits is based on the participant’s separation from service, the first payment will not be made sooner than six months after the participant’s separation.  The maximum payment in any given year is $500,000 and any amounts in excess of $500,000 will be paid in the third and subsequent years following retirement.

Executive Life Insurance

The Corporation provides an endorsement split-dollar life insurance benefit to the US-based Named Executive Officers.  While employed, the death benefit for an executive is generally equal to three times his or her annual base salary, although exceptions may occur due to other compensation arrangements. At the later of retirement or the 15th anniversary of the policy, the Corporation will recover its share of the total premiums paid throughout the life of the policy from the cash value.  At that time, the ownership of the remaining policy and corresponding cash values are transferred to the executive.  Information regarding this benefit is detailed in the “All Other Compensation” column of the Summary Compensation Table.

Change in Control Agreements

The Corporation has change in control agreements with each of its executive officers.  If a change in control occurs (as defined in the agreements) and the executive thereafter terminates employment under circumstances specified in the agreements, the executive is entitled to certain severance benefits. Severance benefits for Mr. M. Batten consist of the sum of his annual base salary (as defined in the agreement) in effect immediately prior to the circumstances giving rise to his termination, plus his most recent annual bonus, times a multiple of 2.5.  Severance benefits for other Named Executive Officers would consist of the sum of the executive’s annual base salary (as defined in the agreements) in effect immediately prior to the circumstances giving rise to the executive’s termination, plus the executive’s most recent annual bonus, times a multiple which is the lesser of 2.0 (1.5 for Mr. Bratel) or the number of whole and fractional years between the termination date and the executive’s normal retirement date.  In addition, the executive would be entitled to the cash value over the exercise price of any shares of common stock subject to unexercised stock options held by the executive, all performance stock and performance stock unit awards would vest and fringe benefits would continue for 24 months following termination.  The agreements are specifically designed to avoid having benefits exceed the limitations and provisions of Section 280G of the Internal Revenue Code.

The performance stock and performance stock unit award agreements and restricted stock agreements between the Corporation and its Named Executive Officers have certain change in control provisions.  Specifically, if a change in control (as defined in the agreements) occurs and the employee thereafter terminates employment under circumstances specified in the agreements, all performance stock and performance stock units shall immediately vest as if the performance objectives had been fully achieved, and all restricted shares shall become freely transferable and non-forfeitable.

Other Personal Benefits and Perquisites

Twin Disc’s Named Executive Officers, along with other executive officers and senior management, are occasionally provided a limited number of perquisites whose primary purpose is to minimize distractions from personal issues to focus the executive’s attention on important initiatives of the Corporation.  An item is not a perquisite if it is integrally related to the performance of the executive’s duties.


 
 

 

Summary Compensation Table

The following table summarizes the “total compensation” of the Corporation’s Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, and its three most highly compensated executive officers for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013.  It should be noted that the total compensation as reported by the Summary Compensation Table follows specific SEC requirements for reporting compensation, and does not reflect the target or actual compensation for the Named Executive Officers for the fiscal year.

 
 
 
 
 
 
Name and Principal Position
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Year
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Salary
 
 
 
 
 
 
(1)
Bonus
 
 
 
 
 
(2)
Stock
Awards
 
 
 
 
 
 
Option
Awards
 
 
 
 
(3)
Non-Equity Incentive Plan Compensation
(4)
Change in Pension Value and Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Earnings
 
 
 
 
(5)
All Other Compens-
ation
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total
                   
Michael E. Batten
2013
$593,267
-
$673,997
 
$0
$121,698
$76,247
$1,465,209
  Chairman and Chief
2012
$567,192
-
$658,215
 
$623,875
$232,495
$65,969
$2,147,746
  Executive Officer
2011
$546,000
-
$1,033,518
 
$649,740
$266,250
$71,804
$2,567,312
                   
John H. Batten
2013
$354,117
-
$464,650
 
$0
$3,568
$91,886
$914,221
  President and Chief
2012
$321,923
$12,788
$403,766
 
$255,750
$4,726
$74,976
$1,073,929
  Operating Officer
2011
$300,000
$30,000
$581,808
 
$255,000
$4,421
$58,303
$1,229,532
     
-
           
Christopher J. Eperjesy
2013
$311,948
-
$369,644
 
$0
$2,569
$70,416
$754,577
  Vice President – Finance,
2012
$298,423
$11,741
$293,150
 
$234,825
$2,986
$67,406
$908,531
  CFO and Treasurer
2011
$286,000
$24,250
$417,354
 
$243,100
$3,297
$57,825
$1,031,826
                   
James E. Feiertag
2013
$309,403
-
$319,590
 
$0
$3,420
$86,088
$718,501
  Executive Vice President
2012
$296,961
$11,664
$281,324
 
$233,275
$4,142
$90,363
$917,729
 
2011
$286,000
$24,250
$404,414
 
$243,100
$4,421
$73,434
$1,035,619
                   
Dean J. Bratel
2013
$213,496
-
$183,808
 
$0
$2,847
$55,741
$455,892
  Vice President –
2012
$201,692
$12,772
$165,295
 
 $127,720
$15,754
$56,627
$579,860
  Americas
                 

(1)  
Discretionary bonuses awarded pursuant to the FY2012 and FY2011 Corporate Incentive Plans, approved by the Compensation Committee on July 26, 2012 and July 28, 2011, respectively.
 
(2)  
Reflects the grant date fair value for each Named Executive Officer as reported in our audited financial statements.  This value was computed in accordance with Financial Accounting Standards Board ASC Topic 718, excluding the effect of estimated forfeitures.  The performance awards are calculated as of the grant date, based on the most probable outcomes of the respective performance goals.  The assumptions made in the valuations are discussed in Footnote K to our 2012 financial statements.  The grant date fair values of the performance-based awards granted in fiscal 2013, assuming the maximum performance goal is achieved, are as follows: Mr. M. Batten, $404,398; Mr. J. Batten, $248,070; Mr. Eperjesy, $187,367 Mr. Feiertag, $179,479; and Mr. Bratel, $106,596.  These calculations are based on the closing share price on the date of grant of $20.48.











(2) cont.
The following table presents separately the compensation expense recognized in FY2013, 2012 and 2011 for outstanding awards of performance stock, performance stock units and restricted stock for Messrs. M. Batten, J. Batten, Eperjesy and Feiertag, and the compensation expense recognized in FY2013 and 2012 for outstanding awards of performance stock, performance stock units and restricted stock for Mr. Bratel:

Name
Year
Performance Stock
Performance Stock Units
Restricted Stock
Michael E. Batten
2013
$0
$725,360
$15,486
 
2012
$0
($389,048)
$306,691
 
2011
$0
$2,555,662
$188,108
John H. Batten
2013
$54,421
$130,836
$227,780
 
2012
$212,429
($61,922)
$192,862
 
2011
$223,199
$430,581
$135,257
Christopher J. Eperjesy
2013
$35,919
$89,893
$176,146
 
2012
$148,132
($42,364)
$141,314
 
2011
$153,942
$296,992
$103,638
James E. Feiertag
2013
$37,224
$90,177
$156,251
 
2012
$146,827
($42,647)
$135,002
 
2011
$153,942
$296,992
$99,666
Dean J. Bratel
2013
$42,567
$14,547
$95,755
 
2012
$73,831
($19,756)
$80,860

(3)  
Reflects cash bonuses earned in connection with achievement of specific performance targets under the Corporate Incentive Plan, described under the “Annual Incentive Compensation” portion of the Compensation Discussion and Analysis, above.  There were no bonuses paid for FY2013 as the threshold performance targets were not met.
(4)  
The figures for FY2013 include a change in qualified pension value amount for Mr. M. Batten ($33,687), Mr. J. Batten ($3,506), Mr. Eperjesy ($2,507), Mr. Feiertag ($3,344), and Mr. Bratel ($2,832).  The figures for FY2013 also include above-market earnings under the Corporation’s Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan (“SERP”) for Mr. J. Batten ($62), Mr. Eperjesy ($62), Mr. Feiertag ($76) and Mr. Bratel ($15), as the SERP guarantees minimum annual interest credits of 3%, which exceeds 120% of the average applicable federal long-term rate for the period from July 2012-June 2013. The remainder of Mr. M. Batten’s total represents a change in his nonqualified supplemental pension plan value.
(5)  
All Other Compensation consists of the following:


Name
401(k) Company Match
Retirement Savings Plan Contribution
Defined Contribution SERP
Life Insurance
Perquisites and Personal Benefits
Total
M.E. Batten
$7,812
$16,250
N/A
$29,502
$22,683
$76,247
J.H. Batten
$7,995
$13,750
$19,588
$29,000
$21,553
$91,886
C.J. Eperjesy
$7,684
$13,750
$16,632
$32,350
-
$70,416
J.E. Feiertag
$7,673
$13,750
$16,423
$48,242
-
$86,088
D.J. Bratel
$6,405
$16,250
$6,426
$26,660
-
$55,741


 
The Corporation’s Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan (“SERP”) was restated during FY2011 to provide a defined contribution formula for the benefits of Messrs. J. Batten, Eperjesy, Feiertag and Bratel. Mr. M. Batten’s benefit under the SERP continues to be expressed under a defined benefit formula, and the changes in his SERP benefit are reported in the “Change in Pension Value and Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Earnings” column in the Summary Compensation Table.

 
Perquisites and Personal Benefits for Mr. M. Batten for FY2013 include personal use of company plane, dues, and premiums paid for supplemental long-term disability insurance.  Perquisites and Personal Benefits for Mr. J. Batten for FY2013 include personal use of company plane, dues, premiums paid for supplemental long-term disability insurance, and fees related to an executive physical.  The aggregate total of perquisites and personal benefits for each of the remaining Named Executive Officers was less than $10,000 for FY2013, and therefore need not be disclosed or included in such Named Executive Officers’ “Other Compensation” total.

 
.

 
 

 

Grants of Plan-Based Awards

The following table provides information on incentive awards granted to our Named Executive Officers during FY2013.
   
 
Estimated Future Cash Incentive Payouts Under Non-Equity Incentive Plan Awards
Estimated Future Share or Unit Payouts Under Equity Incentive Plan Awards
       
Name
Grant Date
Threshold
($)
Target
($)
Maximum
($)
Threshold
(#)
Target
(#)
Maximum
(#)
All other stock awards; Number of shares of stock or units (3)
All other option awards; Number of securities underlying options
Exercise or base price of option awards ($/Sh)
Grant Date Fair Value of Stock and Option Awards (4)
M.E. Batten
                     
 
Cash Incentive
 
$210,000
$420,000
$840,000
             
Performance Stock Awards (1)
7/26/12
                   
Performance Stock Unit Awards (2)
7/26/12
     
13,164
16,455
19,746
     
$336,998
Restricted Stock Award
7/26/12
           
16,455
   
$336,998
J. H.  Batten
                     
 
Cash Incentive
 
$90,750
$181,500
$363,000
             
Performance Stock Awards (1)
7/26/12
     
5,653
7,066
8,480
     
$144,712
Performance Stock Unit Awards (2)
7/26/12
     
2,422
3,028
3,634
     
$62,013
Restricted Stock Award
7/26/12
           
12,594
   
$257,925
C.J. Eperjesy
                     
 
Cash Incentive
 
$78,813
$157,625
$315,250
             
Performance Stock Awards (1)
7/26/12
     
4,270
5,337
6,405
     
$109,302
Performance Stock Unit Awards (2)
7/26/12
     
1,830
2,287
2,744
     
$46,838
Restricted Stock Award
7/26/12
           
10,425
   
$213,504
J.E. Feiertag
                     
 
Cash Incentive
 
$78,125
$156,250
$312,500
             
Performance Stock Awards (1)
7/26/12
     
4,090
5,112
6,135
     
$104,694
Performance Stock Unit Awards (2)
7/26/12
     
1,753
2,191
2,629
     
$44,872
Restricted Stock Award
7/26/12
           
8,302
   
$170,025
D.J. Bratel
                     
 
Cash Incentive
 
$43,250
$86,500
$173,000
             
Performance Stock Awards (1)
7/26/12
     
2,249
3,036
3,644
     
$62,177
Performance Stock Unit Awards (2)
7/26/12
     
1,041
1,301
1,561
     
$26,644
Restricted Stock Award
7/26/12
           
4,638
   
$94,986

 
 

 


(1)
Consists of stock awards with performance-based vesting criteria, as discussed in the “Long-Term Compensation” section of the Compensation Discussion and Analysis; eligible for vesting in 2015.
(2)
Consists of cash awards measured by the value of the Corporation’s common stock as of the vesting date with performance-based vesting criteria, as discussed in the “Long-Term Incentive Compensation” section of the Compensation Discussion and Analysis; eligible for vesting in 2015.
(3)
Consists of restricted stock with a vesting date of July 26, 2015.  This stock will vest if the executive remains employed through the vesting date.
(4)
The grant date fair values are calculated using the closing price of Twin Disc shares on the July 26, 2012 grant date ($20.48).  The grant date fair values for the performance stock and performance stock unit awards are based on the assumption that the target performance objectives for these awards would be met, the most probable outcome as of the grant date.

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End

The following table summarizes the number of shares covered by exercisable and unexercisable options, as well as the number of restricted stock, performance stock and performance stock unit awards held by our Named Executive Officers on June 30, 2013.

 
Option Awards
Stock Awards
Name
Number of Securities Underlying Unexercised Options Exercisable
Number of Securities Underlying Unexercised Options Unexercisable
Equity Incentive Plan Awards: Number of Securities Underlying Unexercised Unearned Options
Option Exercise Price
Option Expiration Date
Number of Shares or Units of Stock That Have Not  Vested
Market Value of Shares or Units of Stock That Have Not Vested
Equity Incentive Plan Awards: Number of Unearned Shares, Units or Other Rights That Have Not Vested
(1)
Equity Incentive Plan Awards: Market or Payout Value of Unearned Shares, Units or Other Rights That Have Not Vested
(2)
M.E. Batten
             
67,915
$1,609,586
J.H. Batten
             
46,562
$1,103,519
C.J. Eperjesy
             
35,981
$852,750
J.E. Feiertag
             
32,314
$765,842
D.J. Bratel
             
20,125
$476,963

(1)  
Reflects the number of non-vested restricted stock awards, performance stock awards and performance stock unit awards which are scheduled to vest at various times between July 2013 and June 2015.  For awards granted in fiscal 2011, only restricted shares are outstanding and are assumed to vest completely.  For awards granted in fiscal 2012 and fiscal 2013 with Threshold/Target/Maximum payout levels, the figures presented assume a threshold level of achievement.
(2)  
Values were calculated using $23.70 per share, the closing price of the Corporation’s common stock as of June 28, 2013.


 
 

 

Option Exercises and Stock Vested

The following table sets forth information regarding each exercise of stock options and vesting of restricted stock and performance stock that occurred during FY2013 for each of our Named Executive Officers.

 
Option Awards
Stock Awards
Name
Number of Shares Acquired on Exercise
Value Realized on Exercise
Number of Shares Acquired on Vesting
Value Realized on Vesting
M.E. Batten
32,000
$477,200
32,596
$634,970
J.H. Batten
   
40,332
$812,421
C.J. Eperjesy
   
27,817
$560,326
J.E. Feiertag
   
27,817
$560,326
D.J. Bratel
   
13,356
$269,034


Pension Benefits

The following table summarizes the actuarial present value of each Named Executive Officer’s accumulated benefits as of June 30, 2013 under our defined benefit pension plan and supplemental executive retirement plan.

Name
Plan Name
Number of Years of Credited Service
Present Value of Accumulated Benefits (1)
Payments During Last Fiscal Year (2)
M.E. Batten
Retirement Plan for Salaried Employees
43.583
$956,833
$85,949
 
Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan
43.583
$3,011,942
 
         
J.H. Batten
Retirement Plan for Salaried Employees
16
$124,473
 
         
C.J. Eperjesy
Retirement Plan for Salaried Employees
11
$86,462
 
         
J.E. Feiertag
Retirement Plan for Salaried Employees
13
$116,096
 
         
D.J. Bratel
Retirement Plan for Salaried Employees
26.5
$177,440
 


(1)  The following key assumptions were made in calculating the present value of the qualified retirement plan.  For Mr. M. Batten, the value assumes a 4.47% discount rate, and reflects the benefit amount and payment method currently elected.  For Messrs. J. Batten, Eperjesy, Feiertag, and Bratel, the key assumptions include a 4.47% discount rate and a retirement age of 65.  No mortality assumption was used prior to retirement.  After retirement, the mortality assumption is the IRS Generational Mortality Table.

With respect to the Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan for Mr. M. Batten, the values are calculated as pursuant to the terms of the Plan document.  No assumptions as to future events are required.  For Messrs. J. Batten, Eperjesy, Feiertag, and Bratel, benefits under the Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan are not calculated under a defined benefit formula, and are therefore not required to be reported on the above table.  However, as of June 30, 2013, the values of the defined contribution credits under the Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan for Messrs. J. Batten, Eperjesy, Feiertag, and Bratel were $89,932, $87,667, $105,748 and $22,525 respectively.

(2)  The qualified retirement plan allows participants to elect to begin receiving benefit payments if they have reached age 70 ½, even if they are still employed.  However, if the employee is a 5% or greater owner, the plan requires the active participant to begin receiving benefit payments no later than April 1 st following the year that the participant attains age 70 ½ .  Since Mr. Batten is a 5% or greater owner who turned 70 ½ in 2010, he began receiving his benefit payments in December of 2010.

 
 

 


Retirement Plan for Salaried Employees

All full-time Twin Disc, Incorporated salaried employees employed before October 1, 2003 participate in the Twin Disc, Incorporated Retirement Plan for Salaried Employees (“Retirement Plan”).  Eligibility for retirement occurs upon reaching one of the following age and service requirements:  a) Age 65 with 5 years of service; b) Age 60 with 10 years of service; c) 30 years of service at any age; or d) age plus service equals 85 points.  Currently Mr. M. Batten is the only Named Executive Officer eligible for retirement.

Prior to January 1, 1997, Retirement Plan benefits were based upon both years of service and the employees’ highest consecutive 5-year average annual compensation during the last 10 calendar years of service.  As of December 31, 1996, the then-current accrued benefits under the Retirement Plan were frozen and the Retirement Plan was amended to provide for future accruals under a cash-balance program. Mr. M. Batten and Mr. Bratel are the only Named Executive Officers with a benefit under both the pre-1997 portion of the Retirement Plan and the cash balance program.

Subsequently, the Retirement Plan was amended to freeze all future benefit accruals, effective August 1, 2009.

The definition of compensation for purposes of calculating the pension benefit includes W-2 income, excluding any expense reimbursements or taxable fringe benefits, and is limited by the IRS maximum compensation as determined each year.  In calendar year 2011, the annual limit was $245,000.  In calendar year 2012, the annual limit was $250,000, and in calendar year 2013, the annual limit is $255,000.

Benefits under the frozen Retirement Plan are payable in a monthly annuity form, with either a single life or joint and survivor life benefit option.  Benefits under the cash balance program are payable in a lump sum payment, or single life or joint and survivor annuity benefit options.

Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan

The Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan (“SERP”) is available to qualified US-based Named Executive Officers.  For those who were participants in the SERP before January 1, 1998 (only Mr. M. Batten), the supplemental retirement benefit is calculated as an annual benefit approximating 50% of highest rate of base salary plus annual incentive bonus attained during a specified period, minus amounts accrued under the Corporation’s Retirement Plan and Salaried Plan.  The SERP also preserved the level of benefits that had accrued prior to 1998.  The July 29, 2010 amendment of the SERP revised the formula for Mr. M. Batten to provide him with a SERP benefit that is at least equal to the present value of his SERP benefit as of July 1, 2010, plus interest credits based on the annual rate on 30-year Treasury securities, with a minimum annual interest credit of three percent.

Any benefits payable under the SERP will automatically be paid in a two-payment deferred lump sum form, under which two equal payments will be made to the participant (or his surviving spouse or named beneficiary if the participant dies prior to all of the payments being made).  The first payment will be made on the February 1 following the calendar year of retirement, and the second payment to be made on February 1 of the following year.  The two payments shall be the actuarial equivalent of the annual benefit calculated under the single life annuity form.

If each of the two lump sum payments exceeds $500,000, each payment shall be limited to $500,000 each with additional payments (also limited to $500,000 each) to be made on each subsequent February 1 until the balance is paid.  If the commencement of benefits is based on the participant’s separation from service, the first payment will not be made sooner than six months after the participant’s separation.

Nonqualified Defined Contribution and Other Nonqualified Deferred Compensation Plans

The following table summarizes accumulated benefits as of June 30, 2013 under our supplemental executive retirement plan for each Named Executive Officer with a benefit under a defined contribution formula under that plan.

Name
Executive Contributions in Last FY
Registrant Contributions in Last FY (2)
Aggregate Earnings in Last FY
Aggregate Withdrawals/ Distributions
Aggregate Balance at Last FYE
M.E. Batten (1)
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
           
J.H. Batten
$0
$19,588
$2,339
$0
$89,932
           
C.J. Eperjesy
$0
$16,632
$2,316
$0
$87,667
           
J.E. Feiertag
$0
$16,423
$2,847
$0
$105,748
           
D.J. Bratel
$0
$6,426
$563
$0
$22,525

(1)  
Mr. M. Batten does not participate in a nonqualified defined contribution or other deferred compensation plan.

(2)  
The amounts reported in the “Registrant Contributions in Last FY” column are credits to a bookkeeping account maintained by the Corporation for the benefit of the Named Executive Officer, and are included in the “All Other Compensation” figures of the Summary Compensation Table.


Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan

The Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan (“SERP”) is available to qualified US-based Named Executive Officers.  For those who became participants after January 1, 1998 (including Mr. J. Batten, Mr. Eperjesy, Mr. Feiertag and Mr. Bratel) the supplemental retirement benefit is calculated as the additional benefit that the participant would have received at retirement under the Corporation’s frozen Retirement Plan and the Twin Disc, Incorporated Retirement Savings Plan for Salaried Employees (“Salaried Plan”), but for the limitation on compensation used in determining benefits under those plans.  In light of the fact that the Salaried Plan is a defined contribution plan with individual accounts, the SERP was amended on July 29, 2010, to restate the SERP benefits of Messrs. J. Batten, Eperjesy, Feiertag, and Bratel as individual accounts, with an opening account balance equal to the present value of their SERP benefits as of August 1, 2009.  In addition to annual accruals based on the additional benefit that would be received under the Salaried Plan but for limits on compensation in that plan, the accounts of Messrs. J. Batten, Eperjesy, Feiertag, and Bratel will receive interest credits based on the annual rate on 30-year Treasury securities, with a minimum annual interest credit of three percent.

Any benefits payable under the SERP will automatically be paid in a two-payment deferred lump sum form, under which two equal payments will be made to the participant (or his surviving spouse or named beneficiary if the participant dies prior to all of the payments being made).  The first payment will be made on the February 1 following the calendar year of retirement, and the second payment to be made on February 1 of the following year.  The two payments shall be the actuarial equivalent of the annual benefit calculated under the single life annuity form.

If each of the two lump sum payments exceed $500,000, each payment shall be limited to $500,000 each with additional payments (also limited to $500,000 each) to be made on each subsequent February 1 until the balance is paid.  If the commencement of benefits is based on the participant’s separation from service, the first payment will not be made sooner than six months after the participant’s separation.

 
 

 

Potential Payments Upon Termination or Change in Control

The following information and tables set forth the amount of payments to each Named Executive Officer in the event of a termination of employment as a result of retirement, death, disability, termination for cause, voluntary termination prior to retirement, and involuntary termination (or resignation for good cause) following a change in control.

·  
Normal or Early Retirement .  The normal retirement age for US-based employees, including the Named Executive Officers, is 65.  All full-time salaried employees employed before October 1, 2003 participate in the Twin Disc, Incorporated Retirement Plan for Salaried Employees and the Twin Disc, Incorporated Retirement Savings Plan for Salaried Employees.  Eligibility for retirement occurs upon reaching one of the following age and service requirements:  a) Age 65 with 5 years of service; b) Age 60 with 10 years of service; c) 30 years of service at any age; or d) age plus service equals 85 points.  Currently Mr. M. Batten is the only Named Executive Officer eligible for retirement.

Medical benefits are only available to Twin Disc retirees hired before October 1, 2003 and who are not yet Medicare-eligible.  Eligibility for retiree medical benefits ends upon reaching Medicare eligibility.

Restricted stock is forfeited if retirement occurs before the restrictions on such shares have ended.

Performance stock and performance stock units will be paid after the end of the relevant performance period, but only if the performance objective is achieved.  The stock or units are prorated based on actual employment during the performance period.

Stock options must be exercised within 30 days of termination or they expire.

A Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan (SERP) is available for the Named Executive Officers who qualify for a retirement benefit under the Corporation’s pension plans.

·  
Death while Employed .  In the event of death of a Named Executive Officer while actively employed, the executive’s estate would receive payment for any base salary earned, but not yet paid.  In addition, any vacation accrual not used would also be paid to the estate.

Restricted stock vests and becomes payable per the terms of the individual grant agreement.  The estate would receive the payment.

Performance stock and performance stock units will immediately vest after the Employee’s termination of employment due to death and be paid as if the maximum performance target has been achieved.  The stock or units are prorated based on actual employment during the performance period.

Options will fully vest and may pass to the estate, or as directed by a will, and must be exercised within one year from date of death.

·  
Disability .  In the event of termination of employment due to disability, a Named Executive Officer would receive benefits under the Corporation’s short-term and long-term disability plans, generally available to full-time salaried employees.  Benefits are reduced for any social security or pension eligibility.

Restricted stock vests and becomes payable per the terms of the individual grant agreement.

Performance stock and performance stock units will immediately vest after the Employee’s termination of employment due to disability and are paid assuming the maximum performance target has been achieved.  The stock or units are prorated based on actual employment during the performance period.

·  
Termination for Cause .  An executive is not eligible for any additional benefits at termination, unless the Compensation Committee would determine that severance payments are appropriate.

·  
Voluntary Termination Prior to Retirement .  An executive is not entitled to any additional forms of severance payments in the event of a voluntary termination, prior to becoming eligible for retirement.

·  
Involuntary Termination (or Resignation for Good Cause) Following Change in Control .  In July 2007, the Corporation entered into Change in Control Severance Agreements with each of our Named Executive Officers.  The agreements provide that,  following a change in control of the corporation (as defined in the agreement) if employment of the executive officer is terminated by the Corporation for any reason other than "Good Cause," or terminated by the executive for "Good Reason" within 24 months after the change in control occurs, certain benefits would become payable.  These include:
o  
severance as a multiple of base salary and most recent annual bonus,
o  
twenty-four months of benefit continuation,
o  
current value of all outstanding stock options,
o  
restricted stock, and
o  
performance stock and performance units immediately vest, and stock or cash is paid under the agreements as if the maximum performance objective was achieved.

In addition, if an event constituting a change in control of the Corporation occurs and the executive thereafter either terminates employment for good reason or is involuntarily terminated by the Corporation without cause, then the performance stock units granted shall immediately vest and a cash payment shall be made as if the maximum performance objective had been fully achieved.  Such cash payment shall be equal to the number of performance stock units granted to the employee multiplied by the fair market value of the Corporation’s common stock as of the effective date of such change in control.


The following tables show the amounts payable under different termination scenarios for each Named Executive Officer as if such scenario occurred on June 30, 2013, the last day of the Corporation’s most recent fiscal year:


 
 

 

Michael E. Batten
 
 
Termination Event
 
Base Salary ($)
 
Bonus
($)
(1)
Non-Equity Incentive Plan
($)
Value of Accelerated Restricted Stock, Performance Stock, Performance Stock Units, and Stock Options
($)
 
Other Benefits
($)
 
Total
($)
Normal Retirement prior to a Change in Control
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$1,846,011 (2)
$3,011,942 (4)
$4,857,953
Death
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$3,083,001 (3)
$3,011,942 (4)
$6,094,943
Disability
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$3,083,001 (3)
$3,311,942 (5)
$6,394,943
Termination for Cause
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0 (6)
$0 (6)
$0
$0
Voluntary Termination Prior to Retirement  (7)
Paid through last day worked
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Involuntary Termination or Resignation for Good Cause Following Change in Control
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$3,477,650 (8)
$6,105,021 (9)
$9,582,671

(1)  
No bonus was earned for FY2013 as performance targets were not met.
(2)  
The amount in the table was calculated by adding the prorated values of the maximum cash payments for the performance stock unit awards (100% of the maximum cash payment for performance stock units payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2013 ($1,630,625), plus 2/3rds of the threshold cash payment for performance stock units payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2014 ($111,785), plus 1/3rd of the threshold cash payment for performance stock units payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2015 ($103,601)).   All performance awards consisted of performance stock units and the sum of performance stock units was multiplied by $23.61, the mean of the high and low selling prices of Twin Disc shares on June 28, 2013.
(3)  
Upon death or disability, performance awards immediately vest and the awards will be delivered pro-rata, based on the assumption that the maximum performance target was achieved.  In addition, restricted shares become non-forfeitable.  The amount in the table was calculated by adding the prorated values of the maximum cash payments for the performance stock unit awards (100% of the maximum cash payment for performance stock units payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2013 ($1,630,625), plus 2/3rds of the maximum cash payment for performance stock units payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2013 ($167,694), plus 1/3rd of the maximum cash payment for performance stock units payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2014 ($155,401)).  In addition, Mr. Batten has 22,316 shares of restricted stock that vest on July 29, 2013, 8,878 shares of restricted stock that vest on July 28, 2014, and 16,455 shares of restricted stock that vest on July 27, 2015 if he remains employed with the Corporation through those dates, respectively.  The maximum cash payments of the performance stock unit awards were determined by using $23.61, the mean of the high and low selling prices of Twin Disc shares on June 28, 2013, and the values of performance shares and restricted shares were determined by using $23.70, the closing price of Twin Disc shares on June 28, 2013.
(4)  
This amount consists of the present value of Mr. Batten’s Supplemental Executive Retirement Benefit Plan benefits.  Mr. Batten is currently retirement-eligible.
(5)  
This amount is the value of six months of benefits beginning July 1, 2013 under the Corporation’s short-term disability program for salaried employees ($300,000) plus the present value of Mr. Batten’s Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan benefits ($3,011,942), as he is currently retirement-eligible.
(6)  
Employees terminated for cause are not entitled to receive performance awards.  This assumes Mr. Batten’s employment was terminated for cause on June 30, 2013.
(7)  
Mr. Batten is retirement-eligible, so all benefits are payable under the retirement section.
(8)  
Upon involuntary termination without cause or resignation for good cause after a change in control, performance stock and performance units immediately vest, and stock or cash is paid under the agreements as if the maximum performance objective was achieved.  In addition, restricted stock becomes fully transferable.  The value of unexercised options is payable in cash.  This amount represents the total of 99,465 outstanding performance stock unit awards valued at $23.61 (the mean of the high and low selling prices of Twin Disc shares on June 28, 2013) and 47,649 outstanding restricted shares valued at $23.70 (the closing price of Twin Disc shares on June 28, 2013).
(9)  
Under the Change in Control Severance Agreement, Mr. Batten is entitled to 2.5 times his base salary plus his most recent annual bonus as a severance payment ($3,059,688), benefit continuation for 24 months ($33,391) and his benefits under his Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan, ($3,011,942) as he is retirement-eligible.

 
 

 

John H. Batten
 
Termination Event
 
Base Salary ($)
 
Bonus
($)
(1)
Non-Equity Incentive Plan
($)
Value of Accelerated Restricted Stock, Performance Stock and Performance Stock Units, and Stock Options
($)
 
Other Benefits
($)
 
Total
($)
Normal Retirement prior to a Change in Control
Not Eligible on 6/30/13
Not Eligible on 6/30/13
Not Eligible on 6/30/13
Not Eligible on 6/30/13
Not Eligible on 6/30/13
Not Eligible on 6/30/13
Death
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$1,827,643 (2)
$0
$1,827,643
Disability
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$1,837,643 (2)
$271,432 (3)
$2,109,075
Termination for Cause
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0 (4)
$0 (4)
$0
$0
Voluntary Termination Prior to Retirement
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$820,011 (5)
$0
$820,011
Involuntary Termination or Resignation for Good Cause Following Change in Control
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$2,070,394 (6)
$ 1,312,392 (7)
$3,382,786

(1)  
No bonus was earned for FY2013 as the performance targets were not met.
(2)  
Upon death or disability, performance awards immediately vest and the awards will be delivered pro-rata, based on the assumption that the maximum performance target was achieved.  In addition, restricted shares become non-forfeitable.  The amount in the table was calculated by adding the prorated values of the maximum cash payments for the performance stock unit awards (100% of the maximum cash payment for performance stock units payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2013 ($294,488), plus 2/3rds of the maximum cash payment for performance stock units payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2014 ($30,866), plus 1/3rd of the maximum cash payment for performance stock units payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2015 ($28,600)), plus the value of the prorated maximum number of shares issuable under the performance stock awards (100% of the maximum shares issuable under the performance stock awards for the performance period ending June 30, 2013 (22,174 shares), plus 2/3rds of the maximum shares issuable under the performance stock awards for the performance period ending June 30, 2014 (3,050 shares), plus 1/3rd of the maximum shares issuable under the performance stock awards for the performance period ending June 30, 2015 (2,827 shares)).  In addition, Mr. Batten has 16,090 shares of restricted stock that vest on July 29, 2013, 5,446 shares of restricted stock that vest on July 28, 2014, and 12,594 shares of restricted stock that vest on July 27, 2015 if he remains employed with the Corporation through those dates, respectively.  The maximum cash payments of the performance stock unit awards were determined by using $23.61, the mean of the high and low selling prices of Twin Disc shares on June 28, 2013, and the values of performance shares and restricted shares were determined by using $23.70, the closing price of Twin Disc shares on June 28, 2013.
(3)  
Of this amount, $181,500 is the value of six months of benefits beginning July 1, 2013 under the Corporation’s short-term disability program for salaried employees.  Any benefits payable after six months are provided by a fully-insured disability carrier.  The remainder of this amount is the June 30, 2013 value of Mr. Batten’s benefit under the Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan (“SERP”), which vests upon termination of employment due to disability but is not payable until the date that Mr. Batten would have attained early or normal retirement age under the SERP.
(4)  
Employees terminated for cause are not eligible for performance awards.  This assumes Mr. Batten was involuntarily terminated for cause on June 30, 2013.
(5)  
This amount reflects performance stock and performance unit awards payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2013.  These awards vested at the maximum performance target.
(6)  
Upon involuntary termination without cause or resignation for good cause after a change in control, performance stock and performance units immediately vest, and stock or cash is paid under the agreements as if the maximum performance objective was achieved.  In addition, restricted stock becomes fully transferable.  This amount represents the total of outstanding shares and units, which consists of restricted shares (34,130) and performance stock (35,229) valued at $23.70 (the closing price of Twin Disc shares on June 28, 2013), and performance stock units (18,068) valued at $23.61 (the mean of the high and low selling prices of Twin Disc shares on June 30, 2013).
(7)  
Under the Change in Control Severance Agreement, Mr. Batten is entitled to 2.0 times his base salary plus most recent annual bonus as severance payments ($1,263,076) plus benefit continuation for 24 months ($49,316).

 
 

 

Christopher J. Eperjesy
 
Termination Event
 
Base Salary ($)
 
Bonus
($)
(1)
Non-Equity Incentive Plan
($)
Value of Accelerated Restricted Stock, Performance Stock, Performance Stock Units, and Stock Options
($)
 
Other Benefits
($)
 
Total
($)
Normal Retirement prior to a Change in Control
Not eligible on 6/30/13
Not eligible on 6/30/13
Not eligible on 6/30/13
Not eligible on 6/30/13
Not eligible on 6/30/13
Not eligible on 6//30/13
Death
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$1,345,890 (2)
$0
$1,345,890
Disability
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$1,345,890 (2)
$231,146 (3)
$1,577,036
Termination for Cause
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0 (4)
$0 (4)
$0
$0
Voluntary Termination Prior to Retirement
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$565,585 (5)
$0
$565,585
Involuntary Termination or Resignation for Good Cause Following Change in Control
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$1,527,714 (6)
$1,172,278 (7)
$2,699,992

(1)  
No bonus was earned for FY2013 as the performance targets were not met.
(2)  
Upon death or disability, performance awards immediately vest and the awards will be delivered pro-rata, based on the assumption that the maximum performance target was achieved.  In addition, restricted shares become non-forfeitable.  The amount in the table was calculated by adding the prorated values of the maximum cash payments for the performance stock unit awards (100% of the maximum cash payment for performance stock units payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2013 ($203,117), plus 2/3rds of the maximum cash payment for performance stock units payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2014 ($22,398), plus 1/3rd of the maximum cash payment for performance stock units payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2015 ($21,595)), plus the value of the prorated maximum number of shares issuable under the performance stock awards (100% of the maximum shares issuable under the performance stock awards for the performance period ending June 30, 2013 (15,294 shares), plus 2/3rds of the maximum shares issuable under the performance stock awards for the performance period ending June 30, 2014 (2,215 shares), plus 1/3rd of the maximum shares issuable under the performance stock awards for the performance period ending June 30, 2015 (2,135 shares).  In addition, Mr. Eperjesy has 12,339 shares of restricted stock that vest on July 29, 2013, 3,954 shares of restricted stock that vest on July 28, 2014, and 10,425 shares of restricted stock that vest on July 27, 2015 if he remains employed with the Corporation through those dates, respectively.  The maximum cash payments of the performance stock unit awards were determined by using $23.61, the mean of the high and low selling prices of Twin Disc shares on June 28, 2013, and the values of performance shares and restricted shares were determined by using $23.70, the closing price of Twin Disc shares on June 28, 2013.
(3)  
Of this amount, $143,479 is the value of six months of benefits beginning July 1, 2013 under the Corporation’s short-term disability program for salaried employees.  Any benefits payable after six months are provided by a fully-insured disability carrier.  The remainder of this amount is the June 30, 2013 value of Mr. Eperjesy’s benefit under the Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan (“SERP”), which vests upon termination of employment due to disability but is not payable until the date that Mr. Eperjesy would have attained early or normal retirement age under the SERP.
(4)  
Employees terminated for cause are not eligible for performance awards.  This assumes Mr. Eperjesy was involuntarily terminated for cause on June 30, 2013.
(5)  
This amount reflects performance stock and performance unit awards payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2013.   These awards vested at the maximum performance target.
(6)  
Upon involuntary termination without cause or resignation for good cause after a change in control, performance stock and performance units immediately vest, and stock or cash is paid under the agreements as if the maximum performance objective was achieved.  In addition, restricted stock becomes fully transferable.  This amount represents the total of outstanding shares and units, which consists of restricted shares (26,718) and performance stock (25,021) valued at $23.70 (the closing price of Twin Disc shares on June 28, 2013), and performance stock units (12,770) valued at $23.61 (the mean of the high and low selling prices of Twin Disc shares on June 28, 2013).
(7)  
Under the Change in Control Severance Agreement, Mr. Eperjesy is entitled to 2.0 times the sum of his base salary plus his most recent annual bonus as a severance payment ($1,123,632), plus benefit continuation ($48,646) for 24 months.

 
 

 

James E. Feiertag
 
Termination Event
 
Base Salary ($)
 
Bonus
($)
(1)
Non-Equity Incentive Plan
($)
Value of Accelerated Restricted Stock, Performance Stock and Performance Stock Units, and Stock Options
($)
 
Other Benefits
($)
 
Total
($)
Normal Retirement prior to a Change in Control
Not eligible on 6/30/13
Not eligible on 6/30/13
Not eligible on 6/30/13
Not eligible on 6/30/13
Not eligible on 6/30/13
Not eligible on 6/30/13
Death
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$1,262,062 (2)
$0
$1,262,062
Disability
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$1,262,062 (2)
$259,995 (3)
$1,522,057
Termination for Cause
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0 (4)
$0 (4)
$0
$0
Voluntary Termination Prior to Retirement
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$565,585 (5)
$0
$565,585
Involuntary Termination or Resignation for Good Cause Following Change in Control
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$1,436,295 (6)
$1,133,280 (7)
$2,569,575

(1)  
No bonus was earned for FY 2013 as the performance targets were not met.
(2)  
Upon death or disability, performance awards immediately vest and the awards will be delivered pro-rata, based on the assumption that the maximum performance target was achieved.  In addition, restricted shares become non-forfeitable.  The amount in the table was calculated by adding the prorated values of the maximum cash payments for the performance stock unit awards (100% of the maximum cash payment for performance stock units payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2013 ($203,117), plus 2/3rds of the maximum cash payment for performance stock units payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2014 ($21,501), plus 1/3rd of the maximum cash payment for performance stock units payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2015 ($20,690)), plus the value of the prorated maximum number of shares issuable under the performance stock awards (100% of the maximum shares issuable under the performance stock awards for the performance period ending June 30, 2013 (15,294 shares), plus 2/3rds of the maximum shares issuable under the performance stock awards for the performance period ending June 30, 2014 (2,126 shares), plus 1/3rd of the maximum shares issuable under the performance stock awards for the performance period ending June 30, 2015 (2,045 shares).  In addition, Mr. Feiertag has 11,339 shares of restricted stock that vest on July 29, 2013, 3,795 shares of restricted stock that vest on July 28, 2014, and 8,302 shares of restricted stock that vest on July 27, 2015 if he remains employed with the Corporation through those dates, respectively.  The maximum cash payments of the performance stock unit awards were determined by using $23.61, the mean of the high and low selling prices of Twin Disc shares on June 28, 2013, and the values of performance shares and restricted shares were determined by using $23.70, the closing price of Twin Disc shares on June 28, 2013.
(3)  
Of this amount, $154,247 is the value of six months of benefits beginning July 1, 2013 under the Corporation’s short-term disability program for salaried employees.  Any benefits payable after six months are provided by a fully-insured disability carrier.  The remainder of this amount is the June 30, 2013 value of Mr. Feiertag’s benefit under the Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan (“SERP”), which vests upon termination of employment due to disability but is not payable until the date that Mr. Feiertag would have attained early or normal retirement age under the SERP.
(4)  
Employees terminated for cause are not eligible for performance awards.  This assumes Mr. Feiertag was involuntarily terminated for cause on June 30, 2013.
(5)  
This amount reflects performance stock and performance unit awards payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2013.  These awards vested at the maximum performance target.
(6)  
Upon involuntary termination without cause or resignation for good cause after a change in control, performance stock and performance units immediately vest, and stock or cash is paid under the agreements as if the maximum performance objective was achieved.  In addition, restricted stock becomes fully transferable.  This amount represents the total of outstanding shares and units, which consists of restricted shares (23,436) and performance stock (24,617) valued at $23.70 (the closing price of Twin Disc shares on June 28, 2013), and performance stock units (12,598) valued at $23.61 (the mean of the high and low selling prices of Twin Disc shares on June 28, 2013).
(7)  
Under the Change in Control Severance Agreement, Mr. Feiertag is entitled to 2.0 times the sum of his base salary plus his most recent bonus as a severance payment ($1,114,878), plus benefit continuation ($18,402) for 24 months.

 
 

 

Dean J. Bratel
 
 
Termination Event
 
 
 
Base Salary ($)
 
 
Bonus
($)
 
(1)
Non-Equity Incentive Plan
($)
Value of Accelerated Restricted Stock, Performance Stock and Performance Stock Units, and Stock Options
($)
 
 
Other Benefits
($)
 
 
Total
($)
Normal Retirement prior to a Change in Control
Not eligible on 6/30/13
Not eligible on 6/30/13
Not eligible on 6/30/13
Not eligible on 6/30/13
Not eligible on 6/30/13
Not eligible on 6/30/13
Death
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$707,350(2)
$0
$707,350
Disability
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$707,350 (2)
$130,650 (3)
$838,000
Termination for Cause
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$0 (4)
$ 0
$0
Voluntary Termination Prior to Retirement (7)
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$271,562 (5)
N/A
$271,562
Involuntary Termination or Resignation for Good Cause Following Change in Control
Paid through last day worked
$0
$0
$810,595 (6)
$583,759 (7)
$1,394,354

(1)  
No bonus was earned for FY 2013 as the performance targets were not met.
(2)  
Upon death or disability, performance awards immediately vest and the awards will be delivered pro-rata, based on the assumption that the maximum performance target was achieved.  In addition, restricted shares become non-forfeitable.  The amount in the table was calculated by adding the prorated values of the maximum cash payments for the performance stock unit awards (100% of the maximum cash payment for performance stock units payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2013 ($97,509), plus 2/3rds of the maximum cash payment for performance stock units payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2014 ($12,639), plus 1/3rd of the maximum cash payment for performance stock units payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2015 ($12,285)), plus the value of the prorated maximum number of shares issuable under the performance stock awards (100% of the maximum shares issuable under the performance stock awards for the performance period ending June 30, 2013 (7,344 shares), plus 2/3rds of the maximum shares issuable under the performance stock awards for the performance period ending June 30, 2014 (1,250 shares), plus 1/3rd of the maximum shares issuable under the performance stock awards for the performance period ending June 30, 2015 (1,215 shares)).  In addition, Mr. Bratel has 8,004 shares of restricted stock that vest on July 29, 2013, 2,229 shares of restricted stock that vest on July 28, 2014, and 4,638 shares of restricted stock that vest on July 27, 2015 if he remains employed with the Corporation through those dates, respectively.  The maximum cash payments of the performance stock unit awards were determined by using $23.61, the mean of the high and low selling prices of Twin Disc shares on June 28, 2013, and the values of performance shares and restricted shares were determined by using $23.70, the closing price of Twin Disc shares on June 28, 2013.
(3)  
Of this amount, $108,125 is the value of six months of benefits beginning July 1, 2013 under the Corporation’s short-term disability program for salaried employees.  Any benefits payable after six months are provided by a fully-insured disability carrier.  The remainder of this amount is the June 30, 2013 value of Mr.Bratel’s benefit under the Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan (“SERP”), which vests upon termination of employment due to disability but is not payable until the date that Mr. Bratel would have attained early or normal retirement age under the SERP.
(4)  
Employees terminated for cause are not eligible for performance awards.  This assumes Mr. Bratel was involuntarily terminated for cause on June 30, 2013.
(5)  
This amount reflects performance stock and performance unit awards payable for the performance period ending June 30, 2013.  These awards vested at the maximum performance target.
(6)  
Upon involuntary termination without cause or resignation for good cause after a change in control, performance stock and performance units immediately vest, and stock or cash is paid under the agreements as if the maximum performance objective was achieved.  In addition, restricted stock becomes fully transferable.  This amount represents the total of outstanding shares and units, which consists of restricted shares (14,871) and performance stock (12,862) valued at $23.70 (the closing price of Twin Disc shares on June 28, 2013), and performance stock units (6,494) valued at $23.61 (the mean of the high and low selling prices of Twin Disc shares on June 28, 2013).
(7)  
Under the Change in Control Severance Agreement, Mr. Bratel is entitled to 1.5 times the sum of his base salary plus his most recent bonus as a severance payment ($535,113), plus benefit continuation ($48,646) for 24 months.

 
 

 

Director Compensation

The following table summarizes information regarding the compensation received by each of our non-employee Directors during FY2013:

Name
Year
Fees Earned or Paid in Cash
Value (1) of Stock Awards
Option Awards
Non-Equity Incentive Plan Compensation
Change in Pension Value and Non-qualified Deferred Compensation Earnings
All Other Compensation
Total
Michael Doar
2013
$53,750
$50,000
       
$103,750
Malcolm Moore
2013
$55,250
$50,000
       
$105,250
David Rayburn
2013
$53,750
$50,000
       
$103,750
Michael Smiley
2013
$48,750
$50,000
       
$98,750
Harold Stratton II
2013
$53,750
$50,000
       
$103,750
David Zimmer
2013
$58,750
$50,000
       
$108,750

(1)
Value of Stock Awards is computed in accordance with Financial Accounting Standards Board ASC Topic 718.

Director Compensation Plan

Outside Directors of the Corporation (i.e. non-Corporation employees) are eligible to participate in the Twin Disc, Incorporated 2010 Stock Incentive Plan for Non-Employee Directors and are paid an annual retainer fee composed of both cash and restricted shares of Twin Disc stock.  The mix of cash and stock is determined by the Board of Directors on an annual basis.  The cash portion is paid quarterly, while the stock portion of the retainer is awarded annually, at the annual shareholders meeting in October.  The restricted shares will vest as of the subsequent annual shareholders meeting.

For FY2013, the Board reviewed its Director Compensation and, consistent with the Corporation’s compensation objectives, increased the annual retainer to $100,000, effective as of the date of the annual shareholders meeting in October.  They determined that the mix for FY 2013 would be 50% cash and 50% restricted stock.

In addition to the annual retainer, committee chairs are paid an annual fee of $5,000.  The chair of the Audit Committee receives a $10,000 annual fee, due to the larger responsibility of the position.  Effective as of the date of the annual shareholders meeting in October 2013, the chair of the Compensation Committee is paid an annual fee of $7,000, due to the larger responsibility of that position.

Director stock ownership guidelines are in place for the outside Directors of the Corporation.  These guidelines will set a target ownership level of two times the value of the Director annual retainer fee, exclusive of committee chair fees.  Directors will have a period of four years to attain their targeted ownership level.  The Compensation Committee monitors compliance with this guideline, using its discretion to address non-attainment issues.

Outside Directors who reach the age of 71 or who retire from full-time employment may be required to retire from the Board of Directors effective as of the completion of their current term.  Retired outside Directors will be entitled to an annual retirement benefit equal to the cash portion of the total annual retainer amount last paid to the Director prior to retirement, exclusive of committee chair fees.  Retirement benefits will be payable for a term equal to the Director’s years of service or life, whichever is shorter.

Compensation Committee Report

The Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors has reviewed and discussed the Compensation Discussion and Analysis with management.  Based on that review and discussion, the Compensation Committee recommended to the Board of Directors that the Compensation Discussion and Analysis be included in the Corporation’s proxy statement and the Corporation’s annual report on Form 10-K.

Members of the Compensation Committee:

Malcolm F. Moore, Chair
David B. Rayburn
David R. Zimmer

 
 

 



Audit Committee Report

The following Report of the Audit Committee does not constitute soliciting material and should not be deemed filed or incorporated by reference into any of the Corporation’s other filings under the Securities Act of 1933 or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, except to the extent the Corporation specifically incorporates this report by reference therein.

The Audit Committee charter reflects standards set forth in SEC regulations and NASDAQ Stock Market rules.  All members of the Audit Committee are independent, as defined in Rule 5605 of the listing standards of the NASDAQ Stock Market.

The Audit Committee has implemented procedures to ensure that during the course of each fiscal year it devotes the attention that it deems necessary or appropriate to each of the matters assigned to it under the Committee's charter.  To carry out its responsibilities, the Committee met five times during fiscal 2013.

As part of its responsibilities, and as set forth in its charter, the Audit Committee met with both management and the Corporation's independent accountants to review and discuss the audited financial statements prior to their issuance and to discuss significant accounting issues.  Management advised the Committee that all financial statements were prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and the Committee discussed the statements with both management and the independent accountants.  The Committee's review included discussion with the independent accountants of matters required to be discussed pursuant to Statement on Auditing Standards No. 61, “ Communications with Audit Committees,” as amended (AICPA, Professional Standards , Vol. 1, AU Section 380), as adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board in Rule 3200T, and SEC Regulation S-X, Rule 2-07, “Communication with Audit Committees.”

The Committee received the written disclosures and the letter required from the independent accountants pursuant to Rule 3526, “Communication with Audit Committees Concerning Independence,” of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board regarding the independent accountant’s communication with the audit committee concerning independence.  The Committee also discussed with PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP matters relating to its independence.

On the basis of these reviews and discussions, the Committee recommended to the Board of Directors that the Board approve the inclusion of the Corporation's audited financial statements in the Corporation’s annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013, for filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Audit Committee
David R. Zimmer, Chair
Michael Doar
Michael C. Smiley
Harold M. Stratton II

July 26, 2013


 
 

 

EQUITY COMPENSATION PLAN INFORMATION

The following table summarizes certain information regarding the Corporation’s equity-based compensation plans as of the end of the most recently completed fiscal year:

 
 
Plan Category
# of Securities to be Issued Upon Exercise of Outstanding Options, Warrants and Rights
Weighted Average Price of Outstanding Options, Warrants and Rights
# of Securities Remaining Available for Future Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans
Equity Compensation Plans Approved by Shareholders
 
69,878 (1)
 
$14.88
 
541,476
Equity Compensation Plans Not Approved By Shareholders
 
0
 
N/A
 
0
TOTAL
69,878 (1)
$14.88
541,476

(1)
Includes   21,600 non-qualified stock options awarded under the Twin Disc, Incorporated 2004 Stock Incentive Plan for Non-Employee Directors.  Also includes 32,110 shares of performance stock that may be issued as of June 30, 2014 under the Twin Disc, Incorporated 2010 Stock Incentive Plan (as amended), assuming the maximum performance goals are achieved.  As of June 30, 2013, the Corporation believes that it is unlikely that the threshold performance goals will be achieved.  Also includes 16,168 shares of performance stock that may be issued as of June 30, 2015 under the Twin Disc, Incorporated 2010 Stock Incentive Plan, assuming the maximum performance level will be achieved.  As of June 30, 2013, the Corporation believes that it is unlikely that the threshold performance goals will be achieved.  Because performance stock awards do not have an exercise price, the weighted-average exercise price does not take performance stock awards into account.

SECTION 16(a) BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP REPORTING COMPLIANCE

Section 16 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 requires the Corporation’s Directors, executive officers and certain persons who beneficially own more than 10% of a registered class of the Corporation’s equity securities to file reports of ownership and changes in ownership of Twin Disc stock.  Based solely on a review of the copies of such forms furnished to the Corporation and representations from executive officers and Directors, the Corporation believes that during the period from July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013, all Section 16(a) filing requirements applicable to its executive officers, Directors and greater than 10% beneficial owners were properly filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

GENERAL

The Corporation will bear the cost of the solicitation of proxies.  The firm of Georgeson Inc., New York, NY has been retained to assist in solicitation of proxies for the Annual Meeting at a fee not to exceed $9,000 plus expenses.

Management does not know of any other business to come before the Annual Meeting.  However, if any other matters properly come before the Annual Meeting, it is the intention of the persons named in the accompanying form of proxy to vote upon such matters in their discretion in accordance with the authorization of the proxy.

If you do not contemplate attending in person, we respectfully request that you fill in, sign and return the accompanying proxy at your earliest convenience.  However, remember that in order to have your proxy validated, it must be delivered to the Secretary either in person, by mail, or by messenger, and it must be received by the Secretary not less than forty-eight (48) hours prior to the date of the Annual Meeting.  Alternatively, shareholders may transmit voting instructions via the Internet by accessing www.investorvote.com/twin or by telephone at 1-800-652-8683.

 
 

 
APPENDIX A

COMPENSATION SURVEYS:  PARTICIPATING COMPANIES UTILIZED



3M Company
7-Eleven
A&P
A. H. Belo
A.O. Smith Corp
A.T. Cross
AAF International
AAR Corporation
AB Mauri Food Inc.
Abbott Laboratories
Accenture
ACH Food Companies
Acme Industries
Acuity Brands Inc
ACUMED LLC
Adobe Systems Inc
ADTRAN Incorporated
Advance Auto Parts Inc
Advanced Micro Devices
Aeropostale
Affinia Group Intermediate Holdings Inc.
AGCO Corp
Agilent Technologies Inc
Agrium
Air Liquide
Air Products & Chemicals Inc
Aker Solutions
AKSteel Holding Corp
Akzo Nobel, Inc.
Albemarle Corp
Alcatel Lucent
Alcoa Inc
Alcon Laboratories
Alexander & Baldwin
Alfa Laval, Inc.
Allegheny Technologies Inc
Allergan Inc
Alliant Techsystems
Alstom Power US - Alstom Transport
Amazon.com
Amcor PET Packaging, Inc.
American Crystal Sugar
American Dehydrated Foods Inc
American Greetings Corporation
Ameron
Ames True Temper
AMETEK Inc
Amgen Inc
Amkor Technology Inc
Amphenol Corp
Amway
Analog Devices
Andersen Corporation
ANH Refractories Company
Anixter Intl Inc
AOC LLC
AOL
APL
Apple Inc
Appleton Papers
Applied Materials Inc
Applied Signal Technology
AptarGroup Inc
ARAMARK
Archer Daniels Midland
Arctic Cat
Armstrong World Industries, Inc.
Arrow Electronics Inc
ArvinMeritor Inc
Asahi Kasei Plastics N.A. Inc.
ASCO - Valve
Ash Grove Cement Company
AstraZeneca
AT&T
Autoliv Inc
Automatic Data Processing
Avanade
Avery Dennison Corporation
Avis Budget Group
Avon Products Inc
Axsys
AZZ Inc.
B Braun Medical Inc
B/E Aerospace Inc
Bacardi U.S.A., Inc.
BAE Systems, Inc. Land & Armaments
Baldor Electric Company
Ball Corporation
Barilla America Inc
Barnes Group
Barrick Gold of North America
Basler Electric Company
Baxter International Inc
Bayer CropScience
Beckman Coulter Inc
Becton Dickinson & Co
Belo
Bemis Mfg Company
Benchmark Electronics Inc
Benjamin Moore & Company
Berry Plastics Corp
Berwick Offray LLC
Best Buy
Big Lots
Bimbo Bakeries USA
Biogen Idec Inc
Biomet
Bio-Rad Laboratories Inc
BJ's Wholesale Club
Blockbuster
Blyth
BMW Manufacturing Corporation
Boehringer Ingelheim
Boeing Co
Boise Cascade, LLC
Boise Inc.
Bombardier Transportation
Borg Warner
Bosch Rexroth Corporation
Boston Scientific Corp
Bovis Lend Lease
Bradley Corporation
Brady Corporation
Briggs & Stratton Corporation
Bristol-Myers Squibb Co
Broadcom Corp
Broadridge Financial Solutns
Brocade Communications Sys
Brown Shoe Co Inc
Brown-Forman Corporation
Brunswick Corporation
BSH Home Appliances Corporation
Bucyrus International Inc
Burlington Northern Santa Fe
Bush Brothers
C.H. Robinson Worldwide
C.R. Bard Inc
Cabot Corp
Cadbury
Calgon Carbon
Callaway Golf Company
Cameron International
Campbell Soup Co
Cardinal Health, Inc.
CareFusion Corporation
Cargill, Inc.
Carhartt Inc
CaridianBCT, Inc
Carlisle Cos Inc
Carlson Companies
Carmeuse North America
Carnival
Carpenter Technology Corporation
Carter's Inc
Cascade Engineering
Catalent Pharma Solutions
Caterpillar Inc
Celgard Inc
Celgene Corp
Cemex, Inc. US
Central Garden & Pet Co
CenturyLink
Cenveo Inc
Cephalon Inc
Cerner Corp
CFIndustries Holdings Inc
CH2M Hill
Chemtreat Inc
Chemtura Corporation
Chiquita Brands International, Inc.
Choice Hotels International
CHS Inc
Church & Dwight Co., Inc.
Cimarex Energy
Cinetic Automation
Cinetic Sorting Corp.
Cintas
Cisco Systems
Citrix Systems Inc
Clearwater Paper Corporation
Cliffs Natural Resources
Clorox Co
COACH
Coats North America
Coca Cola Co
Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated
Colgate-Palmolive Company
Columbia Sportswear
Columbian Chemicals Company
Commercial Metals
Commonwealth Brands, Inc.
CommScope Inc
Community Coffee Company, LLC
ConAgra Foods, Inc.
Constellation Brands, Inc.
Continental Automotive Systems
ConvaTec
Convergys
Cook Communications Ministries
Cooper Industries
Cooper Tire & Rubber Co
Cooper-Standard Holdings Inc.
CooperVision, Inc.
Corn Products
Corning Inc
Covance
Covidien
Cox Enterprises
Cox Target Media
Crane Co
Cree, Inc.
Crocs, Inc.
Crown Castle
CSR
CSX
CTS Corporation
Cubic Corporation
Cummins Inc
Curtiss-Wright Corporation
CVS Caremark
Cytec Industries Inc
Daiichi Sankyo
Dal-Tile Inc
Dana Holding Corp
Danaher Corp
Danaher Motion
Dannon
Darden Restaurants
Dassault Falcon Jet Corporation
Day & Zimmermann
Dean Foods Company
Deckers Outdoor Corporation
Deere & Company
Del Monte Foods
Dell
Delta Air Lines
Deluxe Corporation
Denny's
Denso International America
DENTSPLY Internatl Inc
Dex One
Diageo North America
Diebold, Incorporated
Dionex
Disney Consumer Products
Diversey, Inc.
Dole Food Company, Inc.
Domtar Corporation
Donaldson Company Inc
Dover Corp
Dow Chemical
Dow Corning
Dr Pepper Snapple Group Inc
Dresser-Rand Group Inc
DuPont
E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company
E.W. Scripps
Eastman Chemical Co
Eastman Kodak Co
Eaton Corporation
Echostar Corp
Ecolab Inc
Edwards Lifesciences, LLC
Eisai
Eli Lilly & Co
Elizabeth Arden, Inc.
Elkay Manufacturing Company
Elster AMCO Water, Inc.
Elster American Meter Company
Elster Electricity LLC
EMC Corp
EMCOR Group
Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Emerson Electric
EMI Music
Energizer Holdings Inc
Enpro Industries (Fairbanks Morse Engine)
Equifax
Equity Office Properties
ESCO Corporation
ESCO Technologies
Essilor of America
Estee Lauder Companies, Inc.
Esterline Technologies Corp
Etnyre International Ltd
Evergreen Packaging
Evraz Inc.
Exact Software North America LLC
Exide Technologies
Express Scripts
Exterran
Fair Isaac
Fairchild Controls
Fairfield Manufacturing
FANUC Robotics America
Farmland Foods Inc
Federal-Mogul Corporation
FedEx Office
FEI Company
Fender Musical Instruments
Fenwal, Inc.
Ferrero USA
Ferro Corp
Fiberweb
Fidelity National Information Services
First Solar
Fiserv
Fiskars Brands, Inc.
Fleetwood Group
Flexcon Company Inc
Flexible Steel Lacing Company
Flowers Foods Inc
Flowserve Corporation
Fluor
FMC Corp
Ford
Forest Laboratories
Fortune Brands
Fossil Inc
Foster Poultry Farms
Franklin International
Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold
Fresenius Medical Care NA
Friendly Ice Cream Corporation
GAF Materials
Gannett Co
Gap
Gardner Denver
GATX
Gavilon
GE Healthcare
GenCorp, Inc.
General Atomics
General Cable Corp
General Dynamics
General Mills
General Motors
General Nutrition Inc -- Manufacturing (GNC)
Genzyme Corp
Georg Fischer Signet LLC
Georgia Gulf Corp
Gerdau Ameristeel
Getty Images
Gibraltar Industries, Inc.
Gilbarco, Inc.
Gilead Sciences Inc
Givaudan US
GKN America Corporation
Glatfelter Company
GlaxoSmithKline
GOJO Industries Inc
Gold Eagle Company
Goodman Manufacturing
Goodrich Corporation
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co
Gorton's
Graco Inc
Graham Packaging Company
Grande Cheese Company
Graphic Packaging Holding Co
Greene, Tweed & Co.
Greenheck Fan Corporation
Greif Inc
Gruma
Grupo Ferrovial
GTECH Corporation
GXS
H. J. Heinz Company
H.B. Fuller
Hanesbrands, Inc.
Hannaford
Harland Clarke
Harley-Davidson, Inc.
Harman International Industries Inc.
Harsco Corporation
Harvey Industries
Hasbro, Inc.
Hayward Industries, Inc.
HBO*
Hendrickson International
Henkel Corporation
Henkel of America
Herman Miller, Inc.
Hertz
Hewlett-Packard Co
Hexion Specialty Chemicals, Inc.
High Industries Inc
High Liner Foods Inc.
Hill Phoenix
Hilti Inc
Hilton Worldwide
Hitachi America, Ltd.
Hitachi Data Systems
HNI Corporation
HNTB
Hoffmann-La Roche
Holden Industries Inc
Hologic Inc
Home Depot Inc
Honeywell International Inc
Hormel Foods Corporation
Hospira Inc
Hostess Brands, Inc.
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing
Hubbell Inc
Hu-Friedy Manufacturing Company, Inc.
Hunt Consolidated
Hunter Douglas Inc.
Hunter Industries
Huntsman Corp
Husky Injection Molding Systems
Hutchinson Technology Incorporated
Hyatt Hotels
Hyundai Motor Manufacturing of Alabama
IBM
IDEX Corporation
IDEXX Laboratories Inc
IKON Office Solutions
Illinois Tool Works Inc
IMAX Corporation
IMS Health
Infragistics
Ingersoll-Rand Company Limited
Ingram Industries, Inc.
Ingram Micro Inc
In-Sink-Erator
Insurance Auto Auctions
Intel Corp
Interbake Foods Inc
Intercontinental Hotels
InterMetro Industries Corp
International Business Machines Corp
International Flavors & Fragrances
International Game Technology
International Imaging Materials, Inc.
International Paper Company
Intertape Polymer Group
Intuit Inc
Invacare Corp
Invensys Controls
ION Geophysical
Iron Mountain
Irvine Company
Itron Inc
ITT Corp
J J Keller & Associates Inc
J R Simplot Company
J. Crew
J.M. Smucker
J.R. Simplot
Jabil Circuit, Inc.
Jack in the Box
Jacobs Engineering
James Hardie Building Products
Jarden Corp
JM Family
Jockey International, Inc.
John Crane Inc
John Wiley & Sons Inc
Johns Manville
Johnson & Johnson
Johnson Controls Inc
Jones Apparel Group Inc
Jostens Inc
Joy Global, Inc.
Juniper Networks Inc
Kalsec Inc
Kaman Industrial Technologies
KBR
Keihin North America
Kellogg Company
Kerry, Inc. US
Kewaunee Scientific Corporation
Keystone Automotive Industries
Keystone Foods Corporation
KI, Inc
KIK Custom Products
Kimberly-Clark Corporation
Kinetic Concepts Inc
King Pharmaceuticals Inc
Kingston Technology
Kinross Gold
KLA-Tencor
Klein Tools
Knowles Electronics
Koch Industries
Kohler Company
Kohl's
Komatsu America Corp
Kone, Inc. (USK) US
Kraft Foods Inc
Kyocera America, Inc.
L.L. Bean
L-3 Communications
Lab Volt Systems
Lafarge North America
Lake Region Medical
Lance Inc
Land O'Lakes, Inc.
Lantech.com
LANXESS Corporation US
Lear Corp
Leggett & Platt Inc
Lennox International, Inc.
Leprino Foods Company
Level 3 Communications
Levi Strauss & Co
Lexmark Intl Inc
LG Electronics USA, Inc.
Life Technologies Corp
Limited Brands
Lincoln Electric Hldgs Inc
Lindt & Sprungli (USA) Inc.
Link-Belt Construction Equipment Company
Littelfuse Inc
Little Lady Foods
LKQ Corp
Lockheed Martin Corp
Lonza North America Inc.
Lorillard Inc
Louisiana-Pacific Corporation
Lozier Corporation
LSG Sky Chefs
LSI Corp
Lubrizol Corporation
Luck Stone Corporation - Charles Luck Stone Centers
Lutron Electronics
Luvata Franklin, Inc.
MAG Industrial Automation Systems
Magellan Midstream Partners
Malco Products Inc
Malt-O-Meal
Manitowoc Co
MANN+HUMMEL USA, Inc.
Markem-Imaje
Marriott International
Mars North America
Masco Corp
Master Halco
Mattel Inc
Matthews International
Maxim Integrated Products Inc
McAfee Inc
McClatchy
McCormick & Company Inc
McDermott
McDonald's
McGraw-Hill Companies
McKesson
MeadWestvaco Corporation
Medicines Company
Medline Industries
Medlmmune
Medtronic
Merck & Co.
Merit Medical Systems
Merrill Corporation
MetalTek International
Mettler-Toledo Intl Inc
M-I SWACO
Michael Foods Inc
Michelin North America, Inc.
Micron Technology Inc
Microsoft
Milacron
Millennium Inorganic Chemicals
MillerCoors LLC
Millipore
Mine Safety Appliances Company
Mission Foods
Mitsubishi Motor Manufacturing
Mizuno USA
Mohawk Industries Inc.
Molex
Molson Coors Brewing Company
Molycorp Minerals
Momentive Performance Materials Inc.
Monsanto Co
Moog Inc
Mosaic
Motorola Inc
MTD Products Inc
MTS Systems Corporation
Mueller Industries Inc
Murphy Oil
MWH Global
Mylan Inc
NACCO Industries Inc
Nalco Holding Company
National Tobacco Company
Nature's Sunshine Products Inc
Nautilus, Inc.
Navistar International Corp
NBTY Inc
NCH Corporation
NCR Corp
Nestlé USA, Inc.
NetJets
New York Times Co
Newell Rubbermaid Inc
Newmont Mining
NewPage Corp
NIKE
Nissan North America
Nissin Foods (USA) Co Inc
Nokia
Noranda Aluminum
Nordson Corporation
Norfolk Southern
Northrop Grumman Corp
Novartis
Novell
Novo Nordisk Inc.
Nucor Corp
Nutricia North America
NVIDIA Corp
Nycomed US
Nypro
Occidental Petroleum
Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc.
Oerlikon Balzers Coating USA, Inc.
Office Depot
Ohly Americas
Oil States Industries, Inc.- Arlington
Oil-Dri Corporation of America
Omnova Solutions Inc
ON Semiconductor Corp
Orange Business Services
Orbital Science Corporation
Oshkosh Corporation
OSI Industries, LLC
Owens Corning
Owens-Illinois Inc
Oxford Industries
PACCAR
Packaging Corporation of America
Pactiv Corp
Pall Corporation
Panduit Corporation
Parker Hannifin Corporation
Parsons
Patterson Companies
Pearson Education
Peet's Coffee & Tea
Pentair Inc
Pepsi Bottling Group Inc
PepsiCo Inc
PerkinElmer Inc
Pervasive Software
PetSmart
Pfizer Inc
Pharmaceutical Product Development, Inc.
Pharmavite LLC
Philips North America
Phillips-Van Heusen Corporation
PHOENIX Process Equipment Company
Pilgrim's Pride Corp
Pinnacle Foods Finance LLC
Pitney Bowes Inc
Pittsburgh Corning
Plexus Corp
PM Company
Polaris Industries, Inc.
Polymer Group
Polymer Technologies
PolyOne Corporation
Potash
PPG Industries Inc
Praxair Inc
Preformed Line Products Co
Pressure Chemical Co.
Printpack, Inc.
Probuild Holdings Inc
Psion Teklogix Inc
Pulte Homes
Purdue Pharma
QSC Audio Products Inc
Qualcomm Inc
Quest Diagnostics
Quiksilver Inc
Quintiles
Qwest Communications International Inc
R.R. Donnelley
Ralcorp Holdings Inc
Raytheon Co
REA Magnet Wire Company Inc
Reckitt Benckiser, Inc.
Red Wing Shoe Co
Redcats USA
Reddy Ice
Regal-Beloit
Reichhold, Inc.
Reliance Steel & Aluminum Co
Remington Arms Company, Inc.
Renaissance Learning, Inc.
Revlon
Rexel, Inc.
Reynolds American, Inc.
RF Micro Devices
RiceTec, Inc.
Rich Products Corporation
Richco
Ricoh Americas Corporation
Ricoh Electronics Inc
Rio Tinto
Rite - Hite Holding Corporation
Riviana Foods, Inc.
Robert Bosch LLC
Robert Bosch Tool Corporation
Roche Diagnostics Corporation
Rock-Tenn Co
Rockwell Automation, Inc.
Rockwell Collins, Inc.
Rockwood Holdings Inc
Roper Industries Inc
RR Donnelley & Sons Company
Ryder System
S&C Electric Company
S.C. Johnson
Safety-Kleen Systems
SAGE Publications
SAIC
Sakura Finetek USA Inc
Sanderson Farms Inc
Sandisk Corp
Sandvik, Inc.
Sanmina-Sci Corp
Sanofi Pasteur
Sanofi-Aventis
Sara Lee Corp.
SAS Institute
Sauer-Danfoss
SC Johnson
SCA Americas
Schein Henry Inc
Schlumberger
Schneider Electric
Schnitzer Steel Ind
Scholle Corporation
Schreiber Foods, Inc.
Schwan Food Company
Scotts Miracle-Gro Co
Seaboard Corp
Seagate Technology
Sealed Air Corp
Sealy Inc
Seamen Corporation
Seco Tools Inc
Sensata Technologies, Inc.
Sentry Group
Seventh Generation
Shaw Group Inc
Sherwin-Williams Co
Shire Pharmaceuticals
Shure Incorporated
Siemens
Sigma Foods Inc.
Sigma-Aldrich Corp
Silgan Holdings Inc
Simmons Bedding Company
Simpson Manufacturing
Sirius XM Radio
SJE-Rhombus
Skype
Smead Manufacturing Company
Smith & Nephew
Smith International
Smurfit-Stone Container Corp
Snap-On Inc
Snyder's of Hanover
Sodexo
Solae, LLC
Solo Cup Company
Solutia Inc.
Sonoco Products Co